All posts by Dominic Gilroy

Institutional Repositories – keep it simple!

The reason for being involved in the creation of an Institutional Repository

Creating an Institutional Repository (IR) is about connecting people to people, building on the external reputation of your organisation and increasing access to health and care research funded by public money.

You can chose from bespoke software systems, content management systems, library management systems (LMS), or more straight-forward solutions, for example, Excel spreadsheets and Access databases.

Why I chose to use my LMS for an IR.

  • I wanted to keep it simple.
  • I didn’t want to make the IR a silo. I wanted to raise awareness of knowledge outputs to help put people in touch with one another, and raise awareness of library and knowledge services at the board and throughout the organisation.
  • I wanted to do it within my current budget.
  • Using my LMS means customers find staff papers when they are looking for books on a topic, this is an added bonus.
  • As long as the outputs can be found, for me, the system is not the most important thing. I felt it was better to do it, rather than wait for a gold standard system which may not be affordable.
  • I wasn’t convinced a new system would offer us enough added value, or could offer much more than my LMS could offer. Our system is web-based.
  • To buy a bespoke system would not just cost an initial outlay, but ongoing maintenance costs and potentially storage costs too.
  • Using our LMS increases the scope of the system and provides additional justification for its maintenance.
  • My longer term plan is to link to open access articles where they are available. If I can’t link to full text access, I can still raise awareness of the research. The full text can be sourced though the library.
  • If the research is already available via a university repository or an organisation’s internet page, I plan to explore if I can link to it. However if the content is in PubMed Central, I will link to that, as I hope the links are less likely to break.
  • I don’t store the full-text, I would need additional storage space on our server and copyright can complicate this.
  • Cross linking is important to me, to make the content easy to find. Like many LMS I can create links to specific collections. I have a link which displays all staff papers via our Trust research department.

Hints and Tips to get going

  • The time it takes to set up an IR will depend on how research active or publication active your organisation is.
  • Try and pick a system that won’t become another legacy system or a silo, use one your Trust can easily support.
  • Start with items in the public domain and build on that if you can.
  • Start with staff papers as they are relatively easy to find. Begin by importing citations and use author affiliation searches.
  • Start with the current year; then build on this as far back as you need/want.
  • Seek work experience, college/university work placements and pre-employment placement opportunities, these can help you get an IR up and running and to help maintain it.
  • Consider sharing staff from research departments. It is a shared priority, so see if they can enter some of the information into your system, or can you raise awareness or support them with theirs?
  • If you are storing or linking to internal documents choose a method that will keep them internal (e.g. password protected or on an internal system). Often LMS have hidden categories which can be seen with a password.
  • If you are going to use a straight-forward solution like Excel, then ensure you get advice from library colleagues to make sure you get the best out of it. Items can be categorised, filtered and pick lists created to provide consistency.
  • Speak to library colleagues who you know have an IR or ask the members of the IR task and finish group to buddy you up with a colleague who can help.

Vicky Bramwell

Library Service Manager

Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

(Members of the IR task and finish group are  Lesley Allen, Vicky Bramwell, Dominic Gilroy, Hugh Hanchard, Jackie McGuire, Sue Robertson and Caroline Storer)

Sally Hernando Innovation Award Winners 2017

We are pleased to announce the results of the 2017 Sally Hernando Awards for Innovation.

The three winners were selected by Maria J Grant, editor of the Health Libraries and Information Journal, from the top ten entries voted for by regional judges from NHS Library and Knowledge Services across England.

1st prize goes to Samantha Unamboowe, Library Manager at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust – North West London for her project “Multi-Disciplinary Clinical Innovations Database @ RBHT”.

  • Maria Grant commented “This project exemplifies everything you could hope for from the Sally Hernando Innovation Award by mobilising existing organisational knowledge and expertise with the goal of improving patient care. It works within existing technological structures and builds on local collaborations within the Foundation Trust.”

2nd prize goes to Beth Rawson of Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust for “The Online Research @ Derby Archive (ORDA)”.

  • Maria Grant commented: “Beth’s project speaks directly to the aspirations of the Knowledge for Healthcare Programme in terms of mobilising evidence and organisational knowledge. ORDA uses Open Access Protocols to capture, store and preserve research outputs to respond to increase the exposure of organisational research activities.”

3rd prize goes to Angela Young of Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust for the “30 Day Research Support Challenge”.

  • Maria Grant commented: “Angela’s project draws on the current trends of fitness challenges and gamification to support library staff development in enhancing knowledge and understanding of research needs of clinical and academic library users. She highlights the continued availability of resources beyond the initial 30 days of training module and presents learning points for future developments.”

The full details of these entries, together with the other innovation entries submitted in 2017 and from previous years, can be found on the library services website.  2017 entries have also been added to the Innovations Database and can be searched there.

Congratulations to our winners who will be funded to present their innovations at Health Libraries Group or an equivalent conference to help disseminate their great work.

We encourage NHS Library and Knowledge Services to start work now on recording and evaluating their innovations for the next submission round.

Dominic Gilroy       – NHS LKS Development Manager – Yorkshire and the Humber
Joanne Naughton – NHS LKS Development Manager – North East

Emerging Technologies Group

Ahh statistics.  The mere mention of that ‘word’ sends mortals reaching for top right (top left if you are a Mac user) of the tab, projecting this entry into the ethereal realms of digital oblivion.  Or underneath a steamroller if you are that way inclined.

Therefore, no statistics shall be mentioned (or harmed) in this post.  Instead, I will talk about a theme emerging (a word you will hear lots of today) from Michael Cook’s report.  Responders to a recent survey distributed chose ‘Emerging Technologies’ (yep, that’s that word again) as one of their library development needs.

What does it all mean I hear you wail?  In a walnut shell, the LKS staff would really really like:

* how can technologies be used to benefit the library services

* what do you mean by emerging tech

* how do I get to know about these emerging techs

Confused.com?  Do not fear.

A new group called Emergent Technology Group is here (group name currently a placeholder, a more awesome name is in the works).

We will help you by demystifying weird techie lingos, keep you up to date with cool tech stuff as well as what is already out there for you to use straight away in your library services.  This techie fandangle group is so shiny and new, we are still in the process of identifying various mundane logistic stuff, so please bear with us (rawwr) and do watch out for further news from us.  In the meantime, I humbly invite you all to drop myself or any other members of the group an email should you have comments, ideas, questions or just to share some tasty recipes with us.

One last thing.  The brilliant shiny people in this group are:

Stephen Ayre (George Eliot Hospital)

YiWen Hon (Royal Marsden Hospital)

Catherine Micklethwaite (Torbay and South Devon)

Alexandra Williams (Warrington and Halton Hospital)

Me. (Pennine Care)

 

We will also try not to mention robots too much.

David Low

 

Update: Though statistics were not harmed in the blog, they were slightly bruised.  Therefore here’s a digital wormhole to Michael Cook’s drilled down report, where the numbers welcome your visit with open metaphorical arms.