Category Archives: General

Report from CILIP Privacy Briefing: Things to know and do

CILIP held a Privacy Briefing on 28th November focusing on issues relating to Privacy, particularly in the light of changing data regulation including the General Data Protection Regulations due to come into force in UK law in 2018.

The sessions highlighted the professional obligations of Library and Information professionals in relation to privacy as well as exploring some ways in which libraries, archives, and other bodies where tackling privacy and data protection issues.

My more extensive notes on the day are on the Yorkshire and Humber LKS Wiki but a  summary of actions is below:

Five things LKS professionals should know:

  • The position of the European Convention on Human Rights, and CILIP in relation to privacy rights.
  • How your service handles its customer’s personal data
  • How any third parties (eg: LMS suppliers) handle your customer’s personal data
  • How to balance the customer’s right to privacy with the practical need to deliver the service in the customer’s interest (have you explored the tension, and can you justify the decisions and resulting practices?)
  • Who you can turn to within your organisation for advice in this area.

Five things LKS professionals should do:

  • Review your service’s practice in relation to customer’s personal data and document processes and procedures
  • Undertake a Privacy Impact Assessment using the above data to identify what changes you need to make to ensure your processes are the best they can be
  • Challenge your practice as an information professional with privacy in mind
  • Consider how you can educate your users in relation to privacy (eg: online)
  • Advocate for privacy and contribute to CILIP’s Ethics Review

Dominic Gilroy
NHS LKS Development Manager (Yorkshire and Humber)

Institutional Repositories – keep it simple!

The reason for being involved in the creation of an Institutional Repository

Creating an Institutional Repository (IR) is about connecting people to people, building on the external reputation of your organisation and increasing access to health and care research funded by public money.

You can chose from bespoke software systems, content management systems, library management systems (LMS), or more straight-forward solutions, for example, Excel spreadsheets and Access databases.

Why I chose to use my LMS for an IR.

  • I wanted to keep it simple.
  • I didn’t want to make the IR a silo. I wanted to raise awareness of knowledge outputs to help put people in touch with one another, and raise awareness of library and knowledge services at the board and throughout the organisation.
  • I wanted to do it within my current budget.
  • Using my LMS means customers find staff papers when they are looking for books on a topic, this is an added bonus.
  • As long as the outputs can be found, for me, the system is not the most important thing. I felt it was better to do it, rather than wait for a gold standard system which may not be affordable.
  • I wasn’t convinced a new system would offer us enough added value, or could offer much more than my LMS could offer. Our system is web-based.
  • To buy a bespoke system would not just cost an initial outlay, but ongoing maintenance costs and potentially storage costs too.
  • Using our LMS increases the scope of the system and provides additional justification for its maintenance.
  • My longer term plan is to link to open access articles where they are available. If I can’t link to full text access, I can still raise awareness of the research. The full text can be sourced though the library.
  • If the research is already available via a university repository or an organisation’s internet page, I plan to explore if I can link to it. However if the content is in PubMed Central, I will link to that, as I hope the links are less likely to break.
  • I don’t store the full-text, I would need additional storage space on our server and copyright can complicate this.
  • Cross linking is important to me, to make the content easy to find. Like many LMS I can create links to specific collections. I have a link which displays all staff papers via our Trust research department.

Hints and Tips to get going

  • The time it takes to set up an IR will depend on how research active or publication active your organisation is.
  • Try and pick a system that won’t become another legacy system or a silo, use one your Trust can easily support.
  • Start with items in the public domain and build on that if you can.
  • Start with staff papers as they are relatively easy to find. Begin by importing citations and use author affiliation searches.
  • Start with the current year; then build on this as far back as you need/want.
  • Seek work experience, college/university work placements and pre-employment placement opportunities, these can help you get an IR up and running and to help maintain it.
  • Consider sharing staff from research departments. It is a shared priority, so see if they can enter some of the information into your system, or can you raise awareness or support them with theirs?
  • If you are storing or linking to internal documents choose a method that will keep them internal (e.g. password protected or on an internal system). Often LMS have hidden categories which can be seen with a password.
  • If you are going to use a straight-forward solution like Excel, then ensure you get advice from library colleagues to make sure you get the best out of it. Items can be categorised, filtered and pick lists created to provide consistency.
  • Speak to library colleagues who you know have an IR or ask the members of the IR task and finish group to buddy you up with a colleague who can help.

Vicky Bramwell

Library Service Manager

Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

(Members of the IR task and finish group are  Lesley Allen, Vicky Bramwell, Dominic Gilroy, Hugh Hanchard, Jackie McGuire, Sue Robertson and Caroline Storer)

Emerging Technologies Group

Ahh statistics.  The mere mention of that ‘word’ sends mortals reaching for top right (top left if you are a Mac user) of the tab, projecting this entry into the ethereal realms of digital oblivion.  Or underneath a steamroller if you are that way inclined.

Therefore, no statistics shall be mentioned (or harmed) in this post.  Instead, I will talk about a theme emerging (a word you will hear lots of today) from Michael Cook’s report.  Responders to a recent survey distributed chose ‘Emerging Technologies’ (yep, that’s that word again) as one of their library development needs.

What does it all mean I hear you wail?  In a walnut shell, the LKS staff would really really like:

* how can technologies be used to benefit the library services

* what do you mean by emerging tech

* how do I get to know about these emerging techs

Confused.com?  Do not fear.

A new group called Emergent Technology Group is here (group name currently a placeholder, a more awesome name is in the works).

We will help you by demystifying weird techie lingos, keep you up to date with cool tech stuff as well as what is already out there for you to use straight away in your library services.  This techie fandangle group is so shiny and new, we are still in the process of identifying various mundane logistic stuff, so please bear with us (rawwr) and do watch out for further news from us.  In the meantime, I humbly invite you all to drop myself or any other members of the group an email should you have comments, ideas, questions or just to share some tasty recipes with us.

One last thing.  The brilliant shiny people in this group are:

Stephen Ayre (George Eliot Hospital)

YiWen Hon (Royal Marsden Hospital)

Catherine Micklethwaite (Torbay and South Devon)

Alexandra Williams (Warrington and Halton Hospital)

Me. (Pennine Care)

 

We will also try not to mention robots too much.

David Low

 

Update: Though statistics were not harmed in the blog, they were slightly bruised.  Therefore here’s a digital wormhole to Michael Cook’s drilled down report, where the numbers welcome your visit with open metaphorical arms.