Category Archives: General

Emerging Technology Group Update

Bah (hum) bugs.  Too many easy puns this time of the year.  Too easy…

Now where were we?  Since we last publicised our little group here at the KfH, our team members have been busy bees.  One such bee, Catherine, attended an interesting conference app-tly (like I said, too easy) named Internet Librarian International (ILI) conference.  Click here (www.swimsnetwork.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/newsletters/102-Swimming-Pool-Dec-2017.pdf)

and zoom to page 6 for fantastic insights.

For moi, Lesson #1 is worth a little discussion: fad vs trend.

Hands up to those who have bought that fancy piece of technology only to realise that after one mere annum down everyone’s life, you cannot even find it in ANY bargain basement of well-known low-cost high street shops?  I share your pain.  Truly.  Minidisc anyone?

For me, fad = fashion, trend = usefulness.  To wring it another way, perceived usefulness (fad) versus real usefulness (trend).  Things that showcase as the ‘must buy’, those high-fashion colourful shiny new tech, bits that make you feel superior and full of high status.  FAKE NEWS!!  Mundane, geeky, dull stuff, those you see people quoting lots of numbers and unheard of vernacular on.  REAL NEWS!!

Augmented reality/virtuality is a trend, virtual AI assistant (store.google.com/gb/product/google_home, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Alexa,  microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/cortana ) is a trend and common to popular beliefs, VR glasses is a trend (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Glass ).  Or certainly the beginning of one.  Curved TVs are a fad, >90% screen to body ratio phones are a fad; perhaps even smart watches are a fad.

What does this mean for LKS and the NHS?  Understanding the potential and utilising technological trends is very powerful indeed.  For example:

Virtual reality has already been utilised by cool surgeons for operating on patients (bartshealth.nhs.uk/news/surgeons-use-virtual-reality-to-operate-from-different-sides-of-the-world-2171 ).  AI and voice commands are already being explored within the health sectors by politicians and web giants (www.digitalhealth.net/2017/12/artificial-intelligence-voice-technology-health-sector).

So let’s take this one step further.

What if we can have a virtual library when someone dons  a VR headset/Google Glass?  How about if we use augmented virtuality for educational purposes or to simply tour our Trust (www2.mmu.ac.uk/creativear/projects/the-box-project-mixed-reality/)? How about if we complimented all this by AI virtual assistance to help with FAQs.  I could literally see Estates jumping for joy here at the sound of this, and the cries of ICT department at the implementation.

Hindsight is something of a wonderful thing however, and sadly, I do not have an X-Men like soothsayer’s abilities to predict such outcomes.  Only time will tell.  Ahh there goes my dream of owning an island filled with quokkas.

As the once famous (?) rapper said, back to reality.  Our team look to publish on our specialist technological domains once every two months, lovingly listed below.

David :                  Future concepts (AI; algorithms; augmented reality; automation; gamification)

Yi Wen:                Digital security (encryption; digital security; privacy issues and concerns; anonymity)

Catherine:           Software and apps (FOC and low cost readily available software or programs (for individual use or a small group); mobile apps )

Alex:                      Hardware (current and upcoming hardware (e.g. 3D printers, 3D/QR barcode, iPhone X); translation of industry hardware to LKS settings (e.g. manufacturing, engineering))

Stephen:              e-Platform and delivery methods (e-learning platform (to share knowledge) e.g. using Google Docs for lecture taking; digital social space/media;             digital methods of delivery (e.g. for knowledge mobilisation))

For those who are familiar with the TLDR (too long didn’t read):

Fad = fashion, trend = useful goodness.  Look out AI assistance, VR stuff and cheap VR headsets.  Ignore curved TVs.  I will leave you with one final thought:

are e-books a fad or a trend?

Happy Christmas 🙂

David Low
Emerging Technology Group

LQAF 2018

As we move towards the new year, colleagues providing library and knowledge services to the NHS will be interested to know plans for library quality processes in 2018.

The five core criteria approach taken during 2017 has worked well and Library and Knowledge Service Leads have approved a similar process for 2018 with a change to one of the five core areas.

Criterion 1.1a replaces 1.1c for 2018 meaning the 5 criteria will be:

  Criteria
1.1a There is a designated board member accountable for the library/knowledge service with a clear two-way communication process with the library/knowledge service manager
1.3c The positive impact of LKS can be demonstrated.
5.3h LKS support clinical and management decision making.
5.3l LKS are developed to support information provision for patients and/or the public
5.4a Members of the LKS team are actively involved in the creation, capture, sharing, utilisation, or reuse of knowledge in the organisation served.

We are asking for self-assessment of your service’s compliance level along with evidence for these five criteria.

For other criteria where no change in compliance level has occurred we will ask you to self-assess and provide a statement of “No change from 2017”.  We will only need to see evidence if you are noting a change in the compliance levels recorded for your service in 2017.

The existing library services LQAF webpage has been updated with these details along with the SAT and guidance documents

Plans for assuring the quality of library and knowledge services in 2018

We anticipate being able to pilot the new Library Quality Process during 2018.  Any service which, in agreement with the local HEE Library and Knowledge Service Lead, volunteers to pilot the new process will be exempt from completing the LQAF submission in 2018 and will retain their 2017 LQAF rating during 2018. More details relating to this will follow in due course.

Dominic Gilroy
NHS Library and Knowledge Service Development Manager – Yorkshire and the Humber
LQAF Task and Finish Group Chair
E. dominic.gilroy1@nhs.net

Report from CILIP Privacy Briefing: Things to know and do

CILIP held a Privacy Briefing on 28th November focusing on issues relating to Privacy, particularly in the light of changing data regulation including the General Data Protection Regulations due to come into force in UK law in 2018.

The sessions highlighted the professional obligations of Library and Information professionals in relation to privacy as well as exploring some ways in which libraries, archives, and other bodies where tackling privacy and data protection issues.

My more extensive notes on the day are on the Yorkshire and Humber LKS Wiki but a  summary of actions is below:

Five things LKS professionals should know:

  • The position of the European Convention on Human Rights, and CILIP in relation to privacy rights.
  • How your service handles its customer’s personal data
  • How any third parties (eg: LMS suppliers) handle your customer’s personal data
  • How to balance the customer’s right to privacy with the practical need to deliver the service in the customer’s interest (have you explored the tension, and can you justify the decisions and resulting practices?)
  • Who you can turn to within your organisation for advice in this area.

Five things LKS professionals should do:

  • Review your service’s practice in relation to customer’s personal data and document processes and procedures
  • Undertake a Privacy Impact Assessment using the above data to identify what changes you need to make to ensure your processes are the best they can be
  • Challenge your practice as an information professional with privacy in mind
  • Consider how you can educate your users in relation to privacy (eg: online)
  • Advocate for privacy and contribute to CILIP’s Ethics Review

Dominic Gilroy
NHS LKS Development Manager (Yorkshire and Humber)