Tag Archives: Library Management System

Institutional Repositories – keep it simple!

The reason for being involved in the creation of an Institutional Repository

Creating an Institutional Repository (IR) is about connecting people to people, building on the external reputation of your organisation and increasing access to health and care research funded by public money.

You can chose from bespoke software systems, content management systems, library management systems (LMS), or more straight-forward solutions, for example, Excel spreadsheets and Access databases.

Why I chose to use my LMS for an IR.

  • I wanted to keep it simple.
  • I didn’t want to make the IR a silo. I wanted to raise awareness of knowledge outputs to help put people in touch with one another, and raise awareness of library and knowledge services at the board and throughout the organisation.
  • I wanted to do it within my current budget.
  • Using my LMS means customers find staff papers when they are looking for books on a topic, this is an added bonus.
  • As long as the outputs can be found, for me, the system is not the most important thing. I felt it was better to do it, rather than wait for a gold standard system which may not be affordable.
  • I wasn’t convinced a new system would offer us enough added value, or could offer much more than my LMS could offer. Our system is web-based.
  • To buy a bespoke system would not just cost an initial outlay, but ongoing maintenance costs and potentially storage costs too.
  • Using our LMS increases the scope of the system and provides additional justification for its maintenance.
  • My longer term plan is to link to open access articles where they are available. If I can’t link to full text access, I can still raise awareness of the research. The full text can be sourced though the library.
  • If the research is already available via a university repository or an organisation’s internet page, I plan to explore if I can link to it. However if the content is in PubMed Central, I will link to that, as I hope the links are less likely to break.
  • I don’t store the full-text, I would need additional storage space on our server and copyright can complicate this.
  • Cross linking is important to me, to make the content easy to find. Like many LMS I can create links to specific collections. I have a link which displays all staff papers via our Trust research department.

Hints and Tips to get going

  • The time it takes to set up an IR will depend on how research active or publication active your organisation is.
  • Try and pick a system that won’t become another legacy system or a silo, use one your Trust can easily support.
  • Start with items in the public domain and build on that if you can.
  • Start with staff papers as they are relatively easy to find. Begin by importing citations and use author affiliation searches.
  • Start with the current year; then build on this as far back as you need/want.
  • Seek work experience, college/university work placements and pre-employment placement opportunities, these can help you get an IR up and running and to help maintain it.
  • Consider sharing staff from research departments. It is a shared priority, so see if they can enter some of the information into your system, or can you raise awareness or support them with theirs?
  • If you are storing or linking to internal documents choose a method that will keep them internal (e.g. password protected or on an internal system). Often LMS have hidden categories which can be seen with a password.
  • If you are going to use a straight-forward solution like Excel, then ensure you get advice from library colleagues to make sure you get the best out of it. Items can be categorised, filtered and pick lists created to provide consistency.
  • Speak to library colleagues who you know have an IR or ask the members of the IR task and finish group to buddy you up with a colleague who can help.

Vicky Bramwell

Library Service Manager

Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

(Members of the IR task and finish group are  Lesley Allen, Vicky Bramwell, Dominic Gilroy, Hugh Hanchard, Jackie McGuire, Sue Robertson and Caroline Storer)

Knowledge for Healthcare Strategic Briefing

December 2016


Thank you for your continued involvement in the Knowledge for Healthcare programme of work and for your comments and feedback on the pilot issue of the Knowledge for Healthcare Bulletin. The Library and Knowledge Services Leads have decided to issue a strategic  briefing that brings you the latest news relating to Knowledge for Healthcare.


If you have any comments on this briefing, please email HEE.knowledgeforhealthcare@nhs.net


Regards


Louise Goswami
Head of Library and Knowledge Services Development
Health Education England working across Kent, Surrey and Sussex