All posts by Dominic Gilroy

CILIP Technology Review

CILIP has announced a new project to prepare the library, information and knowledge workforce for the opportunities afforded by new technologies including Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics and Process Automation. These are the technologies which are collectively shaping the ‘4th Industrial Revolution’.

The aim is to undertake a landmark piece of research and deliver recommendations that will facilitate the transformation of the library and information profession into a ‘future-ready’ workforce over the next 5 years through CILIP’s Workforce Strategy.

CILIP would like answers to the following question: How are machine learning, AI, robotics and process automation likely to change the roles and functions of the library, information and knowledge workforce across sectors over the next decade? Our aim is to create a report that may help answer questions like these with recommendations and issues to consider to help guide CILIP and the information and knowledge workforce.

CILIP are seeking case studies to inform their research. It would be great for the Health LIS sector to be involved and represented in this endeavour.

Are you, or any services you know of, currently using or working towards implementing any ‘new; and emerging technologies – such as Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Robotics and Process Automation – then please share your case study using the form linked below:

https://fs3.formsite.com/cilip/jj46obwtwy/index.html?1598524618359

The final report will be overseen by an Editorial Group, chaired by CILIP CEO Nick Poole, and will be published in the Spring of 2021. The overall project is being Chaired by Sue Lacey Bryant, National Lead for NHS Knowledge and Library Services at Health Education England (HEE).

One year on, a global pandemic highlights the importance of evidence-based patient information.”

A year on after writing our project report on ‘making the case for evidence-based patient information’  the importance of evidence-based information has never been more vital. Health hasn’t been just the primary concern for health and care professionals or those individuals with health conditions, it has been the predominant topic for everybody globally.

The coronavirus pandemic (Covid-19) has created, what has felt like, a new industry of information for us all to consume, digest and understand in order for us to go about our daily lives. From following the current guidance to implementing changes to our libraries so we can re-open safely. We also have a role in supporting others in providing accurate and updated information on various aspects of Covid-19 too, to help give trustworthy information to inform their own health decisions and even simple day to day actions such as travel and socialising

The findings of our project report remain as relevant now as they did when we published it;

[1] Evidence-based health information makes a positive contribution to the health care system. The last few months has been a time of uncertainty, creating a sense of fear and anxiety for many of us. It has been challenging to keep track of the various channels of communication to identify authoritative information as well as shining a light on ‘fake news’ about Covid-19. When headlines citing ways of avoiding getting Covid-19 ‘through eating garlic’ or the assumption ‘only older people are susceptible’ to this infection, it provides for a confusing and potentially dangerous information landscape. Engaging our critical appraisal skills can help give others the reassurance needed to locate the most appropriate information or evidence they can understand and feel confident in its accuracy.

[2] The need for evidence-based health information is aligned with a number of high-level strategic priorities which support shared decision-making. The Health information Week web site for 2020’s campaign listed some useful questions to consider when looking at health information, including a number of resources that can be downloaded and adapted for local use. The new NHS LKS web pages  signposting members of the public to health information as well as included information and resources about Coronavirus which are easy to understand and accessible online for patients and the public alike.

[3] Library and Knowledge Services have a key role to play in influencing how health information is produced and delivered within local trusts. Since writing our report there has been a new UK-wide quality standard developed by the Patient Information Forum, TICK which can help us guide others in what they must do in order to provide robust and accurate patient information, one of the components being that it must be evidence based, to further make the case for this and highlight the contribution we can make.

[4] Sharing learning and experience across our networks – throughout the last few months NHS Library and Knowledge Services have demonstrated the benefits of sharing resources on Covid-19. Literature searches and lists of resources have been made widely available by local services so others can tap into more tailored and topics-specific information to support health and care professionals manage the tsunami of Covid-19 related information.

It would be good to hear examples of where NHS LKS have supported patients either directly or through those providing information to patients virtually during the pandemic.

How do we capture new learning and break down some of physical barriers highlighted in our report?

Emily Hopkins, Health Education England
Deena Maggs, The King’s Fund​
Victoria Treadway, NHS RightCare​
Vicki Veness, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust​
Jacqui Watkeys, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust
Suzanne Wilson, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust​

New study identifies positive benefits of the embedded librarian role

A mixed-methods research study, funded by Health Education England, has identified several positive benefits resulting from a librarian working in a critical care team. A return on investment (ROI) analysis indicated that for every £1 invested in the embedded librarian model, a financial value in a range from £1.18 to £3.03 was generated.

Knowledge about conditions and treatments in critical illness can be complex. The critical care team at Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, led by Dr Girendra Sadera, collaborated with the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation at Bangor University to design, implement and evaluate a model of knowledge mobilisation, led by a clinical librarian, to support the knowledge requirements of critical care.

A librarian worked alongside staff in the critical care department for 15 months, delivering a “pop up library”, providing evidence support, training both face to face and virtually, and attending meetings, journal club and other departmental activities. The model supported learning and education across all staff groups, nurtured an evidence-based culture and enhanced the quality of care.

The study findings highlight the pivotal role of the critical care nurse in sharing knowledge between staff and patients; the bedside nurse was considered approachable, reassuring, knowledgeable and trustworthy, and they were a preferred source of knowledge for the patient and family.

Findings demonstrate that a librarian working in a clinical team can feasibly support the knowledge requirements of staff. Return on investment analysis indicated that for every £1 invested in the knowledge mobilisation model, a financial value of £1.18 to £3.03 was generated in time saving, enhanced professional development and improved patient care.

For further information about the study please contact Dr Girendra Sadera, Consultant in Critical Care, girendra.sadera@nhs.net.