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Health Information Week Promotional Resources – new for 2020

As Health Information Week 2020 is fast approaching (6th-12th July), we’d like to update you about the new Health Information Week promotional resources that are now available to you. Please feel free to start to use them to promote any events or campaigns you are running as part of #HIW2020.

In the Resources section of the new website, you will find

  • A wide variety of poster templates
  • Our logo for you to use and some branding guidelines, including the codes for the HIW colours, to make things easier for you
  • There is also a collection of fonts for you to download to make your posters and promotional materials stand out and be identifiable as #HIW2020. Information on how download and install the fonts is also available
  • The Reading Agency has created a Social Media Toolkit for #HIW2020; this is aimed at public libraries, but the information in the toolkit is very useful and can be brought into your setting. We would recommend reading through this

When running and promoting your events, please use the hashtag #HIW2020 and tag us in your tweets, @HealthInfoWeek

If you have any queries about the new resources and templates, please email us: Healthinfoweek@gmail.com.

We are looking forward to seeing all your work next week!

A Glimpse of the Future – Iris.ai in Mersey Care Evidence Service

As an information professional I feel duty bound to continually improve the service I deliver and as a manager I feel it is my responsibility to drive change in my services instead of waiting for change to happen to us. Feeling buoyed by our success in launching our browser extension Lean Library in 2019 we began to explore implementing some form of Artificial Intelligence (AI) into our service.

When researching AI options we backed away from a customer facing search tool as this technology currently lacks the sophistication to handle more than two search terms. Also within the service we already offer our users a variety of access points into the evidence base: HDAS, Discovery tool, our browser extension. So, we had to ask ourselves whether adding another search tool would benefit our users or overwhelm them?

We began to think more deeply about how AI could benefit our service. The primary focus of our team is the creation of evidence reviews: a rapid synthesised literature search available to anyone in the organisation. They are increasingly popular and while our Trust has doubled in size over the last few years the Evidence Service staff numbers have remained static. This growing tension between demand and supply led us to explore whether there was anyway AI could help us in carrying out these searches; this led us to Iris.ai.

We are the first NHS organisation to use Iris, a “young” AI with a primary function of Chemistry R&D although throughout the pandemic it has been used for COVID-19 research. The software is currently made up of two elements called Explore and Focus, Focus mode is essentially a way of refining your search results so below I will focus on the Explore mode; the search function of Iris.

We bought Iris in an off-the-shelf format; it has read and continues to read all Open Access papers (there is a more expensive option which allows it to read all your online holdings). In reading papers Iris can understand keywords, concepts, context and relationships which it can then map against all the other papers it has read. This theoretically changes the nature of searching as the AI will be able to identify relevant papers that might not contain the keywords used in a more traditional search.

The first thing to note when using Iris is that it uses natural language processing (NLP). Essentially, the software wants you to type your question in a normal, fluent format. This is a seismic change for librarians used to honing search questions to the bare number of keywords; Iris wants you to enter between 300 to 500 words. When inputting your question Iris is identifying keywords and context that it will match in the information it has read. A library user isn’t going to deliver their search question in this format so the librarian either needs a strong understanding of the subject area or a dialogue with the user to get the context that IRIS needs to function. On submitting a search question IRIS will create a fingerprint of your results comprised of concepts it has identified.

Fig 1. Iris concept map

At this stage you can download all results or click into concept cells and see the papers Iris has identified for you, clicking into a paper gives you the option for Iris to search for related papers. In this image the 76% is the relevancy score Iris has attached to a specific paper.

Fig 2. Sample result

At this point you can begin to remove unhelpful terms, promote more helpful terms and apply limits such as date or relevancy percentage. Applying any filter creates a modified concept map.

Fig 3 search limiters

Fig 4 hierarchy screen

We negotiated our deal with Iris at the start of 2020 with a start date of 1st April; so as with many things our use has been affected by COVID-19 as our team priorities shifted and our opportunity for collaborative learning decreased. In this current state the software is a very specialised tool, in no way intended for your library user or student and even for information professionals it presents a steep learning curve asking us to reformulate questions in a way that might feel unnatural to us. We use Iris concurrently with HDAS; so in this sense it is not saving us research time however it does add depth to our searches finding relevant papers that are not returned through standard methods.

As I mentioned earlier Iris is still “young” at version 6.0 and will continue to develop and grow, with an exciting future already outlined. Essentially we are asking not what Iris can do for us today but what we may do together in the future. Moreover investing in Iris, and our other technologies has not only directly benefitted the service but has also help change the perception and profile of the evidence service in the wider organisation, in this sense embodying change, progress and technology can never be a wasted investment.

Andrew Cheney
Evidence Services Lead
Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust
www.evidentlybetter.org
@evidentlybetter

New website to help you with Health Information Week

The evaluation of Health Information Week 2019 highlighted that people involved in #HIW2019 would have liked a central website with resources for those running events, and for patients and members of the public.

This year, with support from the Patient Information Forum, we have created a central website.

In response to your feedback, we commissioned a professionally designed logo and branding on the website. Please do copy the logo and use the colours in your local Health Information Week resources. We will be adding posters which you can adapt for local use soon.

The website focuses on the two themes for #HIW2020:

  • Finding information you can trust,

and

  • Physical and mental wellbeing.

These themes were adapted from the longer list originally published, to reflect the impact of covid-19.

The website contains several different sections to help you with planning and running Health Information Week 2020 (#HIW2020):

  • The Public Information page gives some basic guidance for members of the public on finding high quality information. It also includes questions to ask to evaluate patient information. As requested by you, this is a central place to direct patients and members of the public.
  • The Resources page has downloadable resource sheets to help you plan #HIW2020 events:
    • Some of the resource sheets focus on information you may want to highlight to your users – General health information sources; Apps; Charities; Finding information (information on finding and evaluating information); Quality standards (for health information); Physical wellbeing; and Mental wellbeing.
    • Others focus on how to run an event. As well as the Ideas Bank, there is also a resource sheet on running an online event which will be particularly relevant given current social distancing restrictions.
  • Keep up with the latest updates from the Health Information Week team on our blog page
  • If you want to contact the team, as well as healthinfoweek@gmail.com or @HealthInfoWeek , you can now use our Contact Form.

Your feedback at the #UKMedLibs Twitter chat on 19th May suggested we should prioritise paying for a domain name. The team is currently investigating implementing this for 2021, so the web address will not change before #HIW2020 starts on 6th July.

Lindsay Snell, University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust, and Sheena Campbell, Patient Information Forum