All posts by Richard Bridgen

Coronavirus information for patient groups

A key role for library and knowledge specialists through the pandemic is to signpost to trusted information. Notably, we can help NHS organisations fulfil their obligations under the Accessible Information Standard to provide information for patients, service users, carers and parents with a disability, impairment or sensory loss.

HEE’s Library and Knowledge Services team identified that it is difficult to find information about COVID-19 in accessible formats and for specific patient groups. In liaison with Public Health England, NHS England/Improvement and the Patient Information Forum, we have compiled information:

We will be adding information for carers, for people with specific conditions and on health and well-being.  Please help us to promote these invaluable resources to health and care staff and to information workers in other sectors.

The resources at https://library.nhs.uk  are the first part of a website promoting the work of NHS library and knowledge specialists to the healthcare workforce, the public and other stakeholders.  If you have thoughts on topics that you would like to see covered on Coronavirus or in the new website, please contact KFH.England@hee.nhs.uk

AI For Healthcare: Equipping the Workforce for Digital Transformation

AI For Healthcare was a course created by Health Education England and the University of Manchester, to provide a general overview of AI and how it can and is being used in the health sector. Anyone could access this course for a limited amount of time, although it was designed for healthcare workers in mind.

As someone who’s really interested in AI and machine learning (and a big fan of the Topol Review), I took the plunge and had a go. The course was incredibly useful, providing a great introduction to AI. It showed working examples of how it could be utilised, and the pros and cons of implementing new technologies.

Discussion was actively encouraged, and I chatted with wide variety of people working within the healthcare sector. There was the occasional quiz, but mostly people benefited from the rich conversations taking place in the comments sections.

The course was split into five weeks:

  • Week 1: Motivating AI in Healthcare
  • Week 2: What is Artificial Intelligence
  • Week 3: Data in Healthcare
  • Week 4: Making it Work
  • Week 5: Supporting and Skilling the Workforce

The first week was a brief introduction to the course, and looked at the opportunities and challenges of working within the health sector; using technologies to assist with healthcare in an increasingly demanding setting.  It was also an opportunity to introduce ourselves within the discussion, and how we believe our roles could utilise AI in the future. I mentioned monitoring library usage (seeing what resources/topics are popular) and targeted promotion, making resources more accessible and findable for users, more relevant current awareness updates and taking the edge out of literature searching.

We focused on ethical and social aspects of AI and machine learning, generating interesting discussion around if we would be comfortable with being provided personal information and news regarding our health by AI, and whether AI should be used by healthcare professionals to inform decision making. There was also debate on whether AI could essentially ‘replace’ certain services, such as GPs. The general consensus was that as the technology is designed to support, rather than replace services, that it is not capable or desirable for technology to replace human roles.

Further down the line, we looked at cases of AI in action with regards to identifying cancer in breast images. This was particularly topical as it had been recently reported in the news.

There was also an introduction to ‘team science’ theory, creating interdisciplinary teams to work together on projects. Experts from all kinds of different fields and backgrounds will be required for the development of AI in healthcare. Having a diverse range of professionals with different backgrounds, expertise and insights would be highly beneficial, both to reduce bias in software and to create something which can be used by a wide variety of people. I was keen to point out that LKS workers have great skills around Knowledge Management, accessibility and user-centred design, and that having LKS staff embedded into multidisciplinary teams would be an excellent use of our expertise.

We also looked at the challenges of AI; its implementation, management, and the need to educate and train staff on how to use it effectively. I believe this in particular is a golden opportunity for LKS staff; to educate, train, and advocate for the user, enabling them access to quality technology and providing them a safe space to learn and develop new skills.

All in all, the course was an excellent introduction. Being able to network with healthcare professionals was also very useful, as I was able to gage their thoughts and feelings about AI. The course tutors and mentors were fantastic, contributing to discussion and encouraging people to think outside the box. It was heartening also to see the support and interest from others in the roles of LKS staff, and how AI can be a useful tool in our libraries.

Below is a list of some resources which were recommended by the course:

 

Hannah Wood
Librarian
Weston Area Health Library
hannah.wood8@nhs.net

National LKS Website – User Research Update

As you will know, the HEE Library and Knowledge Services’ Resource Discovery Team has been conducting some further user research to establish your requirements for the planned national LKS website.  To this end we have:

  1. Conducted 19 one-to-one interviews with stakeholders, and end users for identified gaps
  2. Ran 2 x user needs face-to-face workshops with a range of stakeholders and end users in Leeds and London (February 1 and 25) to generate user personas and user journey scenarios.  Users were from all regions of the country working in a variety of professional and paraprofessional library and knowledge services’ roles
  3. Ran 1 x user needs virtual workshop with a range of end users (April 10) to generate user-personas and user journey scenarios
  4. Analysis of a user needs validation survey with 172 responses
  5. Analysis of a pre-user discovery phase website functionality needs survey with 199 responses
  6. Created and prioritised 37 user stories with the HEE team

May we say a big thank you to all of who contributed to this research.  The data gathered form all of this activity has been drawn together and a report produced summarising our conclusions.  The report, National Library and Knowledge Services Website: User Research can be found on the KfH blog under Resource Discovery | Websites for Library staff.

27 user needs for the national LKS website were identified and prioritised into Must Haves; Should Haves and Could Haves  Most needs based on the validation survey have been prioritised must haves.

Top needs for the site:

  • Act as for a single point of access to LKS documents and resources whether national or regional.
  • Have good search functionality and filtering.
  • Be easy to use, to be written in plain English and to be visually appealing.  It must be kept up to date.
  • Work within the constraints of the ICT systems and policies in use within local NHS Trusts
  • Work well on mobile devices as well as the desktop
  • Download and upload documentation from and to the site easily
  • Users are alerted to any new and modified content in which they are interested
  • Communities of practice and collaborative tools are important.
  • Support career development and induction of those new to the profession
  • Offer a range of communication tools so that users can find out what’s going on. This must include mailing lists.
  • Calendars of events filtered by region must be available.
  • Allow users to connect to peers, find mentors, coaches, collaborators and others with skills to facilitate learning

This research and the report has now been presented to the Digital Communications Team at HEE and we are meeting next week to discuss how best to start work on developing a national LKS website which meets these identified needs.

Richard Bridgen on behalf of the HEE LKS Resource Discovery Team