Category Archives: General

Place-based Care

What do we mean by place? There is much talk across health and social care about the future being “place-based” and it is not always easy to grasp what this is all about.

Here is an introduction to get you going:

Place-based

A simple proposition lies at the heart of place-based care: that we blur institutional boundaries across a location to provide integrated care for individuals, families and communities. Energy, money and power shifts from institutions to citizens and communities. Devolution becomes an enabler for a reform programme that starts to deliver on the long-held promise of joining up health and social care for a population in a place, with the ultimate aim to improve the public’s health and reduce health inequalities.”(1)

There is added value in:

    • collaborating at different levels in the system
    • building up from places and neighbourhoods
    • providing leadership across the system
    • focusing on functions that are best performed at scale” (2)

The King’s Fund offer the following definitions:

  • System – area covered by Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) or Integrated Care System (ICS) (size varies but they cover one to three million people)
  • Place – area covered by local authority (tend to cover populations of around 250,000 to 500,000 people)
  • Neighbourhood – smaller geography that might correspond to district council boundaries or covered by a primary care network (PCN) (tend to cover populations of around 30,000 to 50,000 people) (2)

What will this look like in practice?

Groups of organisations including NHS trusts and local authorities will work together as an STP to decide on priorities for their place, and this may evolve to form an ICS and work together more formally. This will mean people with local knowledge developing the right services for their population across a whole area. It is designed to acknowledge the fact these services are not experienced in isolation by the people using them – although they are run by separate organisations, the thing they all have in common is the people from that place. It may also mean trusts agreeing that staff can work across different sites, or for some highly specialised services to be offered by one trust rather than several.

 

National organisations such as HEE as well as NHS England and Improvement and Public Health England, have teams aligned to each STP or region. These teams will work as a link between the locally driven priorities, and nationally provided initiatives such as those to develop (in HEE’s case) the right workforce to meet the needs of each place as well as the country as a whole.

As a very simple (and entirely fictitious) example, Anytown identifies that they have an aging population and rates of dementia are predicted to increase. They need staff with the right skills to meet their population’s needs, to run the right services such as specialist dementia clinics. This local intelligence can be fed into national plans by HEE to create postgraduate courses for nurses to become specialist dementia practitioners with a number of places offered to nurses from the area. The same local intelligence also identifies that many of the city’s GP workforce is rapidly approaching retirement, and they could be facing a shortage soon. An initiative could see additional placements for trainee GPs offered, to help encourage new staff to consider moving to the local area.

So, it should mean greater collaboration between organisations within a particular area and ideally, seamless care for the person receiving it.

What might this mean for you in your library and knowledge service as you support place-based care? ​

Are there local partners who you need to work with to support and improve your offer across your STP or region?​

References:

  1. The journey to place-based health, Public Health Matters
  2. Health and Wellbeing boards and integrated care systems, The King’s Fund

Emily Hopkins and Katie Nicholas
Knowledge Management Service
Health Education England

Implementing Knowledge for Healthcare

Dear colleagues,

The first phase of implementing Knowledge for Healthcare has taken us from 2015 to 2020. I write to keep you in the loop about our current work and as we move into the next stages, refreshing the Knowledge for Healthcare strategy for 2021 and beyond.

The contribution of evidence and health information has never been more significant than in these quite extraordinary times – and this underlines our commitment to ensuring we keep the work on track. It is progressing to time.

Direction of Travel

Following feedback from Library Services Managers in 2019, discussions in network meetings earlier this year, and from our thinking within HEE, we are reaffirming the direction of travel of Knowledge for Healthcare. This remains unchanged and focused on ensuring the right knowledge and evidence are used at the right time in the right place.

“NHS bodies, their staff, learners, patients and the public use the right knowledge and evidence, at the right time, in the right place, enabling high quality decision-making, learning, research and innovation to achieve excellent healthcare and health improvement.” Knowledge for Healthcare Vision, 2015

Going forward you will see a continuing emphasis on these themes: Health Literacy and Patient Information underpinned by digital literacy, Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge across the NHS, Resource Discovery to optimise investment in digital resources; building a Workforce that is diverse, inclusive and digitally confident and, not least the Quality and Impact of library and knowledge services.

Keeping You in the Loop

I attach our Plan on a Page for the HEE team during 2020/21 and also a ppt update which depicts the direction for the coming years.

We find it helpful to use Driver Diagrams as a strategic planning tool to frame the direction. Each diagram sets out the “primary driver” we are working towards, followed by the “secondary drivers” and then specific “interventions” which we believe will deliver on these.

Finally, the level of engagement in Knowledge for Healthcare by health library and knowledge services staff across England has been remarkable. Thank you. By all means come back to us with any queries or comments. Please contact your regional lead as your first port of call:

With every good wish,
Sue Lacey Bryant

All the world’s a blog, and all the men and women merely bloggers (1)

That’s how it seems, isn’t it, a blog for everything, and everything in its blog?  But what if you are new to the art of blogging? Where on earth do you start? Enough of the questions, let’s get down to the answers!

First things first, take a look at some existing blogs and see what you think. Dip your toe in the water by posting a comment or two on someone else’s blog before attempting one yourself. This will help you find your voice and develop your style. You can be as relaxed and conversational as you like and let your creativity loose.

When you are ready to launch your blog, have a look on the internet. There are plenty of quick and easy blog templates to be found there and many of them are free. Think of a memorable name that you won’t get tired of and select a URL …web address to you and me…so people can find you.

Now, think about your audience. Who are they likely to be and what would you like them to know? Draw them in with a catchy headline and keep them interested with short, sharp paragraphs – 3 or 4 sentences max – separated by line spaces. Try not to cover too much ground.

Remember, this is writing for an online audience who will scan. Keep their eyes occupied so they don’t leave too soon. Your message should be brief and not too wordy. Who wants to read miles of text on a screen?

Lists are good!

  • So are Subheadings
  • and different fonts
  • and, as the saying goes, a picture paints a thousand words.

Perhaps try your early posts out on a few friends and colleagues before you go live. Why not add some social media buttons? And take the time to respond to those who have posted their comments on your blog.

A word of caution, though. Be ethical! Take note of your Trust’s communication policy and keep within the guidelines. Never use someone else’s ideas without giving them due credit and always respect the privacy of others.

Have Fun!

Stella Rogers, Senior Library Assistant @Great Western Hospital, Swindon

(1) To paraphrase William Shakespeare