Category Archives: Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge

KM to KM – Knowledge Management to Knowledge Mobilisation: a trend?

A reflection from David Stewart

“Knowledge Management (KM), what’s that then?” A question I used to dread. That “crunch” moment in the lift when a very senior person asks you a question that really takes more than 30 seconds to answer. I had never heard of knowledge management until the later 1990s; it certainly did not feature in my librarianship course in 1981, but then neither did computers!

Once I heard the term, I started to try to find out more. There was a bewildering array of theoretical articles some of which promised to supercharge our workplace; others were very dismissive; “knowledge can’t be managed” I collected them together and soon had two box files full and was none the wiser. Then someone pointed me to a local academic, Dr Jim Hughes at Salford University who was lecturing in KM. Jim ran a whole series of seminars for North West NHS librarians in the early 2000s, helping us to understand where it came from and what it might be. We also worked with Dr Chris Mimnagh, a GP and commissioner who was very enthusiastic about the potential of KM. Chris now works with The Innovation Agency in the North West.

Over the next fifteen years KM appeared to come and go, sometimes being treated as a “nice to have” and not a priority in financially constrained times. Nevertheless, it became an important strand as we wrote and published Knowledge for Healthcare in December 2014. The Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge workstream has been our programme for bringing Knowledge Management to the centre of our offer into the healthcare system. This firmly twins our long-established role in disseminating and providing access to evidence from research and practice with a corporate responsibility to better manage and use knowledge and shared learning.

Five years on, and reviewing what we have achieved, I believe we have moved significantly on the KM front. Almost all NHS library and knowledge services (note that we now refer to knowledge services  as an integral part of our function) have been able to demonstrate, via their Library Quality Assurance Framework (LQAF) returns, that they are actively involved in some aspect of KM within their trust. We have recently published a new edition of the KM Framework postcards describing learning before, during and after techniques; more and more of us can run a knowledge café and understand what the goldfish bowl technique is. More NHS organisations are using the Health Education England self-assessment tool to assess how well they are using evidence and organisational knowledge, working with health library and knowledge specialists to prioritise KM activities.  We are about to initiate market research on potential demand for an e-qualification in KM for NHS staff.

I believe we are in a very different KM space than even five years ago. Listen to my recent Webinar on the background and context of Quality and Improvement Outcome Four of the new Quality and Improvement Outcomes Framework where I say that KM “will become the every-day core of what we do” – delivering Knowledge and Library Services to ensure that organisational knowledge and best evidence are mobilised to achieve excellent healthcare and health improvement.

David Stewart, Head of Library and Knowledge Services North, Directorate of Innovation and Transformation, Health Education England

 

 

New study identifies positive benefits of the embedded librarian role

A mixed-methods research study, funded by Health Education England, has identified several positive benefits resulting from a librarian working in a critical care team. A return on investment (ROI) analysis indicated that for every £1 invested in the embedded librarian model, a financial value in a range from £1.18 to £3.03 was generated.

Knowledge about conditions and treatments in critical illness can be complex. The critical care team at Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, led by Dr Girendra Sadera, collaborated with the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation at Bangor University to design, implement and evaluate a model of knowledge mobilisation, led by a clinical librarian, to support the knowledge requirements of critical care.

A librarian worked alongside staff in the critical care department for 15 months, delivering a “pop up library”, providing evidence support, training both face to face and virtually, and attending meetings, journal club and other departmental activities. The model supported learning and education across all staff groups, nurtured an evidence-based culture and enhanced the quality of care.

The study findings highlight the pivotal role of the critical care nurse in sharing knowledge between staff and patients; the bedside nurse was considered approachable, reassuring, knowledgeable and trustworthy, and they were a preferred source of knowledge for the patient and family.

Findings demonstrate that a librarian working in a clinical team can feasibly support the knowledge requirements of staff. Return on investment analysis indicated that for every £1 invested in the knowledge mobilisation model, a financial value of £1.18 to £3.03 was generated in time saving, enhanced professional development and improved patient care.

For further information about the study please contact Dr Girendra Sadera, Consultant in Critical Care, girendra.sadera@nhs.net.

What is the use of Knowledge Management in a time of crisis?

On the 19th May CILIP held an online conference event exploring the role of knowledge management during a time of disruption and crisis, such as the pandemic of Covid-19 that we are currently living through.

Perspectives were shared by knowledge management specialists working in local and national government, overseas, finance, utilities and healthcare organisations.

As Nick Poole, CEO of CILIP, describes in his article Knowledge Management in a time of crisis, lessons learned from COVID-19, even at this ‘event’ phase of COVID-19

“Knowledge Management has already shown its value in helping our society and our economy adapt to its strange new circumstances.”

It was interesting to hear how in each of the different industries featured, techniques of knowledge management were recognised as adding value to working experiences.

Some thought provoking questions were shared  during the event to consider the ongoing part knowledge management can play at this time and in the gradual recovery phase still to come.

  • How do you/your organisation handle measurement and celebrating successes? How is it different from others?
  • How do you persuade management to support KM initiatives?
  • How do you improve knowledge sharing across geographical and cultural differences?
  • How do you handle misinformation/knowledge, poor quality information/knowledge and overload?
  • What have we learned from the crisis that will be useful for everyday practice?

Slides from the KM in a time of crisis

Narrated presentation about KM in a time of crisis in healthcare by Louise Goswami and Alison Day