Category Archives: Resource Discovery

TripPro – liberating the librarian

Thank you to everyone who completed our online survey about TripPro back in December. We had a good response from an estimated 35% of NHS library services in England in addition to feedback from Public Health library teams.  Your feedback helped inform the decision for HEE to fund TripPro nationally for a further two years from April 2019.

What you said about the benefits of TripPro 

  • It’s used by many to support mediated literature search services, often as a scoping tool in the initial stages of a search 
  • It’s a handy short cut to grey literature, particularly useful for guidelines and systematic reviews  
  • It’s useful in training sessions, especially to demonstrate the hierarchy of evidence to newer users as it is so clearly laid out  
  • It’s a quick and easy way to focus non-professional searchers on quality documents 
  • It complements NICE Evidence search 

What’s new? 

  • Trip has recently started working with UnPayWall and as a result up to 70% of all articles (depending on document age and clinical area) are now available as full-text link outs 
  • The search technology has been upgraded, so the indexing is better and search results are more focused than previously 
  • Automated evidence maps have been added as a novel way of exploring the evidence base for interventions in a given topic area 
  • The Trip app is now available on the Apple App Store – and an Android version will be available soon 

What’s next? 

Your feedback also highlighted some of the limitations of TripPro and the scope for closer integration with other resources, more access routes and better signposting. We are working with Jon Brassey, Director of TripPro to explore ways to address these and will keep you updated.  

How do I access it? 

Access to TripPro is via IP address so you should get seamless access to the Pro version from your workplace. If you find you can’t access the Pro features, contact Jon Brassey with your organisation’s IP address (jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

If you would like further details or a copy of the full survey report, please contact Helene Gorring, Library & Knowledge Services Lead in London and KSS. 

Updated guidance from your NHS Copyright First Responders!

With the arrival of the new CLA Licence Plus for the NHS in England in April, and new recruits to the Copyright First Responders’ Group, we’ve taken the opportunity to review and refresh the guidance we provide for healthcare library staff at http://www.libraryservices.nhs.uk/forlibrarystaff/information/nhs_copyright.html.

The actual changes to the Licence are small – hospice staff are now covered, we may now place bulletins containing journal article/database abstracts on our websites, and we have a new supplier of Copyright Fee Paid articles (Reprints Desk) alongside the existing ones (BL and the RSM Library). But we’ve been through all the guidance with fresh eyes, to see where we might make things clearer or present information differently.

The updated resources include:

We have also made a slight modification to the good practice guidelines for current awareness services, in the section on IPR and copyright.

If you haven’t looked at these resources for a while, do consider finding time to do so. And if you have a copyright query, you know where we are! nhscopyrightqueries@libraryservices.nhs.uk

Helen Bingham
Head of Knowledge Services and Technology Enhanced Learning (South)

Digital knowledge resource discovery and delivery infrastructure for the NHS in England: outcomes of work with Ken Chad Consulting

The background

One of the key ways to drive delivery of the Knowledge for Healthcare vision is by ensuring the healthcare workforce has quick and easy access to relevant digital knowledge and evidence resources at the point of need. This is the focus of the Resource Discovery work stream.

HEE and NICE (and their predecessor organisations) have provided the same basic digital resource access infrastructure – comprising HDAS search, a national Link Resolver/Knowledge Base and OpenAthens authentication – for many years. There are also multiple library management systems in use across the country, and an increasing number of locally-implemented discovery systems.  With changing user preferences and expectations, shifting digital and publishing environments, advances in technology, and ever present financial scrutiny, there was a clear need to review – and potential to modernise and streamline – the infrastructure.

We had already collected information and opinion about the LMS and discovery systems in place and about products on the market, with desk research undertaken on behalf of HEE by Catherine Micklethwaite (Library Service Manager at Torbay & South Devon NHS Trust). This made a significant contribution to our understanding of the status quo and possible future options, but the sheer complexity of the operational landscape means there was no obvious single way forward.  The audit of NHS library services previously undertaken by Ciber Research Ltd had recommended ‘a national discovery engine’ and ‘a single national LMS’ but we felt these recommendations needed further scrutiny. We decided some external expert input would help us to crystallise our goals and articulate our strategy, and following a tendering process, selected Ken Chad Consulting to provide this.

The approach

Ken’s approach was to facilitate a series of five stakeholder workshops. We invited a mix of librarians to participate, including those working in strategic/resource management roles in HEE and NICE, and those managing services/resources and supporting staff at local level in healthcare settings and so close to end-user needs (see below for a list of participants).

Each workshop had a different focus:

  1. The situation ‘as is’: what do we and our systems currently do, why and what are the pain points?
  2. Strategy: given the context, our customers, the competition and our capabilities, what is it that we should focus on achieving, by when?
  3. Jobs to be done: what jobs do our customers need to get done? What problems do they need to solve?
  4. Value propositions: what are the value propositions (benefits) our system(s) can provide? Can our customers get these elsewhere?
  5. Keep, stop, add: given all the above, what do we and our systems need to keep doing, stop doing and start doing?

The outcomes

The workshops generated a lot of discussion and debate, information and insight. Amongst the conclusions to emerge are that:

  • The goal should be ‘to provide NHS staff with a single national gateway to their trusted library and knowledge service, connecting them seamlessly to quality resources, services and support, tailored to their needs’.
  • The two most critical drivers are to provide end users with a better experience, and to reduce the complexity of the existing fragmented infrastructure, which is contributing both to deficiencies in user experience and high maintenance costs.
  • Our initial focus should be on end-user (non-expert) discovery and access to local and national resources. HDAS and native interfaces are for the most part meeting the needs of advanced/expert searchers.
  • We should invest in a single national discovery system, with an integrated knowledge base/link resolver, end-user article requesting and a library staff interface for mediated document sourcing and supply.
  • Although a single national LMS is not realistic in the short or medium term, we should plan to transition from legacy library management systems, to fewer, more modern systems which would use the discovery layer of the national discovery system.

Next steps

The HEE Resource Discovery workstream leads have developed a plan of work to take forward these recommendations. If you would like more information, or are interested in being involved, please contact any of the following HEE staff:

London and KSS: Lucy Reid, Helene Gorring

Midlands and East: Richard Bridgen

North: Dominic Gilroy

South: Helen Bingham, Jenny Toller

Workshop participants

Helen Alper, Kaye Bagshaw, Helen Bingham, Igor Brbre, Sue Lacey Bryant, Richard Bridgen, Ruth Carlyle, Alan Fricker, Dominic Gilroy, Helene Gorring, Natasha Howard, Celestine Johnston, Sarah Maddock, Catherine Micklethwaite, Tracey Pratchett, Lucy Reid, Marion Spring, Jenny Toller, Fran Wilkie, Helen Williams.