Category Archives: Patient and Public Information TaF

Health Information Week 2019 – Monday 1 – Sunday 7 July 2019

Helping patients and the public find high quality health information!

Health Information Week is a national, multi-sector campaign to promote high quality information for patients and the public. High quality health information can have a huge impact on people’s ability to stay healthy and manage illnesses effectively, giving them a better quality of life.

Preparing for Health Information Week 2019 (1st- 7th July 2019).

We’re excited to announce that the Health Information Week 2019 (#HIW2019) themes are:

· Monday 1st July: Healthy lifestyles

· Tuesday 2nd July: Mental health; and patient stories

· Wednesday 3rd July: Health and digital literacy

· Thursday 4th July: Long term conditions; and social prescribing

· Friday 5th July: Innovations for preventing illness

· Saturday 6th July: Patient stories

· Sunday 7th July: Mindfulness and relaxation

You may want to use all the themes at once, or focus on a couple – whatever works for you! The national #HIW2019 team will suggest information resources for each theme in advance, and will Tweet them on the day using #HIW2019

If you are a patient information provider, or work in a public library, NHS library, or any other organisation with an interest in high quality health information for patients, you can start planning now. #HIW2019 is a great opportunity to work with colleagues in and outside your organisation. It’s part of public libraries’ Universal Health Offer, and the Patient and Public Information strand of the NHS Knowledge for Healthcare Framework. Think about:

· Who might want to work with you from your organisation? For example, public health (local councils); PALS, patient information, Trust membership teams (NHS organisations); or anybody else with an interest. Why not contact them about working together for #HIW2019?

· What other organisations might like to work with you? For example, NHS libraries, public libraries, health charities, hospices, medical writers, key influencers on the themes above or anybody else working with patients locally. Why not contact them about working together for #HIW2019?

· What impact do you want your involvement in #HIW2019 to have? Impacts in previous years have included raising awareness of specific resources such as local support groups, Books on Prescription, or the NHS website http://www.nhs.uk ; helping individuals with their health information queries; and motivating and enthusing people to look for high quality health information. As always, we’ll evaluate #HIW2019 afterwards, to make #HIW2020 even bigger and better. · Would you like to use any of the resources from last year at https://kfh.libraryservices.nhs.uk/patient-and-public-information/health-information-week-2/ ? We will let you know as soon as updated versions are ready, but there are some great ideas there already.

· Why not also follow @Healthinfoweek on Twitter? We’re planning to crowdspeak to make an impact on social media – look out for more information on getting involved.

If you have any questions now, contact the #HIW2019 team on: healthinfoweek@gmail.com

Health Literacy: an issue for life

To make good decisions about our health, we need to find, understand, appraise and apply health information.  This is the essence of good health literacy.

 

What is the issue?

Levels of health literacy in England are very low: 43% of working age adults cannot understand textual health information, rising to 61% when a numeracy element is added (1); and 43% adults are unable to calculate paracetamol dosage for a child based on age and weight (2).  Individual health literacy also varies.  If someone has just had a significant diagnosis, then their ability to comprehend information will be reduced.

As people live longer with multiple health conditions, they need to be able to make the treatment choices that are right for them, and to understand how to use self-management techniques or take medications.

 

What role for health library staff?

Working with patients and the public takes different forms within NHS library and knowledge services.  All depend upon library and knowledge services staff having the confidence to see how core skills in finding evidence and appraising sources apply to health information materials for patients and the public.  Supporting the health literacy awareness of colleagues, and identifying information resources of differing levels of complexity, can enable library and knowledge services to have an impact on the way that patient information materials are used.  This supports treatment choice and effective self-management of health conditions.  For this reason, health literacy is a priority for Knowledge for Healthcare work on patient and public information in 2018-2020

Library personnel in education and public library sectors are keen to collaborate on health literacy, as the information literacy and digital literacy skills that they promote feed into health literacy. Whereas good information literacy in education may be seen as a short-term benefit for coursework, health literacy is a life skill.

 

What next?

In 2018-19 we will be offering training on health literacy awareness and accredited “train the trainer” training for health library and knowledge services staff in England, which can be used as the basis of training for NHS staff and partner organisations, including public libraries.

In the meantime, resources are available to increase your awareness of health literacy issues, with tools that you can use.  Working with NHS England, Public Health England and the Community Health and Learning Foundation, Health Education England has developed a health literacy toolkit, including case studies and a “how to” guide https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/health-literacy .

If you have ideas, questions or would like to be involved in shaping health literacy activity, contact Ruth.Carlyle@hee.nhs.uk

Ruth Carlyle

References

  • Rowlands, G. et al. A mismatch between population health literacy and the complexity of health information: an observational study. British Journal of General Practice Jun;65(635):e379-86. doi: 10.3399/bjgp15X685285. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26009533
  • Mayor, S. 2012. Nearly half adults in England don’t understand health information, study indicates. British Medical Journal 345:e8364 https://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e8364

New resources for Health Information Week 2018

Health Information Week 2018 (2nd-8th July) is coming up on the horizon. Join in using this year’s hashtag #HIW2018.

There are so many ways to get involved online and/or through events and other activities.  Now is a great time to gather initial ideas on how your service might participate in this year’s campaign.

To support you, some additional resources are being developed by a project team from the 2017-2018 HEE/CILIP Leadership Programme.

Why not start with this postcard (pdf and Word versions available) to generate some ideas among your teams, regional colleagues or other partners?

Don’t forget there are many helpful tips and resources available to you – we hope to add more resources in the next few weeks – http://kfh.libraryservices.nhs.uk/patient-and-public-information/health-information-week/

We have also created a dedicated Twitter account @Healthinfoweek that you can follow for updates.

Coming soon

  • Report on learning from HIW2017 including results from a recent survey and some useful case studies
  • Marketing templates
  • Signposting to further resources

In addition, we are exploring evaluation templates and developing partnerships with other sectors to strengthen HIW as a national campaign. So, watch this space!

Please contact any of the project team members below if you have any queries

Health Information Week Project Team
Health Education England / CILIP Leadership Development Programme

Louisa Fulbrook – Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Louisa.Fulbrook@rjah.nhs.uk

Steph Grey – Public Health England  Stephanie.Grey@phe.gov.uk

Linda Kalinda – Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust l.kalinda@nhs.net

Jenny Kendrick – NICE jenny.kendrick@nice.org.uk

Sarah Lewis- Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust sarah.lewis23@nhs.net

Clare Quigley – Self Help UK clare.quigley@selfhelp.org.uk