Tag Archives: Collaboration

Place-based Care

What do we mean by place? There is much talk across health and social care about the future being “place-based” and it is not always easy to grasp what this is all about.

Here is an introduction to get you going:

Place-based

A simple proposition lies at the heart of place-based care: that we blur institutional boundaries across a location to provide integrated care for individuals, families and communities. Energy, money and power shifts from institutions to citizens and communities. Devolution becomes an enabler for a reform programme that starts to deliver on the long-held promise of joining up health and social care for a population in a place, with the ultimate aim to improve the public’s health and reduce health inequalities.”(1)

There is added value in:

    • collaborating at different levels in the system
    • building up from places and neighbourhoods
    • providing leadership across the system
    • focusing on functions that are best performed at scale” (2)

The King’s Fund offer the following definitions:

  • System – area covered by Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) or Integrated Care System (ICS) (size varies but they cover one to three million people)
  • Place – area covered by local authority (tend to cover populations of around 250,000 to 500,000 people)
  • Neighbourhood – smaller geography that might correspond to district council boundaries or covered by a primary care network (PCN) (tend to cover populations of around 30,000 to 50,000 people) (2)

What will this look like in practice?

Groups of organisations including NHS trusts and local authorities will work together as an STP to decide on priorities for their place, and this may evolve to form an ICS and work together more formally. This will mean people with local knowledge developing the right services for their population across a whole area. It is designed to acknowledge the fact these services are not experienced in isolation by the people using them – although they are run by separate organisations, the thing they all have in common is the people from that place. It may also mean trusts agreeing that staff can work across different sites, or for some highly specialised services to be offered by one trust rather than several.

 

National organisations such as HEE as well as NHS England and Improvement and Public Health England, have teams aligned to each STP or region. These teams will work as a link between the locally driven priorities, and nationally provided initiatives such as those to develop (in HEE’s case) the right workforce to meet the needs of each place as well as the country as a whole.

As a very simple (and entirely fictitious) example, Anytown identifies that they have an aging population and rates of dementia are predicted to increase. They need staff with the right skills to meet their population’s needs, to run the right services such as specialist dementia clinics. This local intelligence can be fed into national plans by HEE to create postgraduate courses for nurses to become specialist dementia practitioners with a number of places offered to nurses from the area. The same local intelligence also identifies that many of the city’s GP workforce is rapidly approaching retirement, and they could be facing a shortage soon. An initiative could see additional placements for trainee GPs offered, to help encourage new staff to consider moving to the local area.

So, it should mean greater collaboration between organisations within a particular area and ideally, seamless care for the person receiving it.

What might this mean for you in your library and knowledge service as you support place-based care? ​

Are there local partners who you need to work with to support and improve your offer across your STP or region?​

References:

  1. The journey to place-based health, Public Health Matters
  2. Health and Wellbeing boards and integrated care systems, The King’s Fund

Emily Hopkins and Katie Nicholas
Knowledge Management Service
Health Education England

Working collaboratively across distances within the NHS

Early 2018, Natalie Gabe and Chloe George were both asked to join the Library and Knowledge Services Engagement Group South. An opportunity to create and pilot a series of webinars for healthcare staff working in NHS South arose and we both put our names forward. We wanted to create a community of practice to share expertise and knowledge across the region ‘virtually’.

The plan was to run webinar sessions for each topic chosen and engage both professional and para-professional staff. We have run webinars on GDPR, PPI, Value & Impact and are planning much more.

We hadn’t spoken before we joined the group, let alone worked together. We soon discovered that although we had both participated in webinars neither of us had facilitated or booked a session before. We needed some training and needed to find a willing presenter for our first webinars. Calling upon regional expertise, we learnt how to use WebEx and how to organise an online training event.

Being responsible for the smooth running of the webinars was challenging. There is always the worry of technical problems but having the two of us helped this as we always had each other for support. Buddying up has been very rewarding and fun; it just felt so easy working alongside each other. Bringing people together and giving them the opportunity to get involved has been fantastic. The fact that the webinars are live, give us a buzz, not quite a radio show, but it feels great doing them.

If you would like to find out more about our webinar project, please contact us.

Chloe George
Senior Library Assistant
Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust chloe.george@nhs.net

Nat Gabe
Knowledge Specialist
Hampshire Healthcare Library Service Natalie.Gabe@southernhealth.nhs.uk

Greater Collaborations Toolkit

Can there be any one of us working in the NHS who isn’t affected in some way by a new working relationship with another organisation? The NHS landscape is changing at a faster pace than previously, and driven mostly by financial pressures mergers/alliances and partnerships have been springing up in many places.  

Does this affect our library services? If so how, and how do you survive a time of organisational change which may see the joining of two previously separate services?  

To help try and answer some of these questions a Task and Finish Group was set up to develop a toolkit for supporting service redesign – including mergers, amalgamations and the potential for ‘fewer services covering larger geographies’.  

The Task and Finish Group set about combining their experiences of having been through some sort of “coming together” to produce materials which might benefit colleagues who find themselves in a similar position.  

This group has now concluded the initial task and have produced an ABC Guide, shared case studies and background reading to support library staff and their managers through the often difficult process of coming together.  

These materials are the start and there is a case study template available for anyone who wishes to share their experience for the benefit of others. Please contribute to this developing resource.  

 The work is not intended to be the definitive guide to how (or how not!!) to combine services but highlights some common issues which you might encounter and things that will happen that you might not expect. 

 The following are the members of the Task and Finish Group who produced the guide and supplementary information 

 Emma Aldrich, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust 

Helen Alper, Barts Health NHS Trust 

Daryl Bate, University Hospitals of the North Midlands NHS Trust 

Sam Burgess, Southern Health NHS Trust 

Catherine Fisher, City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust & South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust 

Mic Heaton, Derby Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 

Becky Williams, Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust 
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Sue Lacey Bryant

Topol Review Programme Manager;
& Senior Advisor, Knowledge for Healthcare