Tag Archives: funding models

Digital knowledge resources: rethinking NHS investment

Digital knowledge resources are high on the agenda. We know that NHS library services across England will recently have spent time finalising subscriptions for 2020. Those with April-March subscriptions will be gearing up for a similar round of activity in the Spring, involving publishers and local procurement and finance departments. Next there is all the associated work of updating holdings in catalogues and link resolvers to be done.

Elsewhere in the UK healthcare library staff now spend very little time on activity relating to e-resources. In Scotland, Wales and Ireland, the vast majority of NHS-funded digital knowledge resources are purchased and managed centrally, freeing up time for local library staff to focus their expertise on delivering knowledge services to users.

In England only 25% of total NHS spend on e-resources is invested nationally, and all the work associated with 75% of investment has to take place locally. Given the commonality of the resources we see being purchased locally for acute, mental health and community staff, and in the context of the principles of Knowledge for Healthcare principles relating to equity, efficiency and economy of scale, these proportions should surely be the other way around.

Open access publishing is advancing. The transition from payment for access to payment for publication is gathering pace. In our knowledge-based industry embracing the administration involved in article processing fees hardly seems a good use of the time and expertise of already-stretched NHS library staff. A nationally coordinated approach makes even more sense.

With the majority of HEE library funding distributed to trusts within education tariff, we can currently only take small steps towards this. We continue to engage with suppliers about the need for fair and transparent pricing which incentivises collaborative procurement, uses appropriate workforce numbers rather than bed numbers, recognise the value of content over platform-specific ‘bells and whistles’, and will support cost-neutral transition to open access, and some have responded very positively. HEE has commissioned NICE to procure a new Framework Agreement to replace the one which expires in September 2020 and we expect it to reflect all these principles.

We’re working hard to seek the introduction of a separate LKS Tariff which may provide a mechanism for pooling funded, but re-stacking public investment in digital collections will continue to rely on the willingness of library teams and host trusts to share costs and combine effort. The signs are promising: our 2018 survey of managers indicated that 86% would definitely or possibly be willing to pool e-resource funding nationally. We see lots of potential to scale up successful local collaborative procurement schemes. Greater central and national procurement will avoid replication of effort, freeing up staff time that local service managers can choose to direct resource into services to staff and learners, in the best interest of patients.

As we go into a new decade, the future lies in your hands. We are gearing up for the challenge of the new decade! Are we ready?

Season’s Greetings from the HEE Library Leads Resource Discovery Team
Helen Bingham, Richard Bridgen, Dominic Gilroy, Helene Gorring, Lucy Reid and Jenny Toller

Update from HEE LKS Leads

A few points of feedback for LKS managers and teams from the meeting of the HEE Library and Knowledge Service Leads Group on 26 February:

  • Developing and making the case for an equitable funding model for NHS LKS is a current high priority. We hope to be able to engage with Trusts on our proposals during this year.
  • With the Department of Health, we are currently negotiating extension of the CLA Licence Plus for the NHS in England for a further five years from April 2018.
  • With NICE, we are progressing re-procurement of a new national core content collection from April 2019, and also exploring options for extended collaborative purchasing of e-resources. Our thinking informed by feedback from the 90% plus LKS teams who responded to our survey and provided information about local investment in e-resources – thank you!
  • Work continues on development of the new national LKS quality assurance process, which will feature a much reduced number of quality standards with associated evidence requirements, and graded levels of attainment. The process will be piloted by a small number of LKS this year.
  • Building on the work to date within the Knowledge for Healthcare Public and Patient Information work stream, it has been agreed that the role of health librarians in supporting health literacy will be the focus of this work stream for the next two years. A blog post about this will follow shortly.
  • The Workforce Planning and Development work stream has identified CPD priorities for the LKS workforce for the next two years, drawing on feedback from recent development needs analyses and a review of strategic priorities. Meanwhile, we are submitting a response about the healthcare LKS workforce to the consultation on ‘Facing the Facts, Shaping the Future’ (the draft national workforce strategy for health and care for England to 2027).
  • Three more STEP literature searching e-learning modules are now available, and a new set of knowledge management e-learning modules are in development, with the design of the knowledge management postcards being refreshed to match.
  • More #AMillionDecisions social media cards are being created, featuring quotes about the role of library knowledge specialists from senior national NHS leads. An HEE LKS presence at June’s NHS Confederation Conference will provide a further opportunity for high level advocacy, and we are delighted that a number of Knowledge for Healthcare-related papers have been accepted for this year’s HLG and EAHIL conferences.

If you have comments or queries relating to this bulletin, please contact your HEE LKS Lead.

Follow the money – auditing and reviewing the investment in LKS

Do we know where the money invested in NHS library and knowledge services comes from?

Do we know how much is invested?

We all have questions about the funding levels and whether it is appropriate for what is expected to be delivered as part of an NHS library and knowledge service.

Health Education England has commissioned CIBER Research Ltd. http://ciber-research.eu/ to carry out an audit/review with the aim of improving the effectiveness and value for money of these services to the NHS and associated bodies, their staff and learners. The review has three objectives:

  1. To analyse the existing data to determine whether, and how, the levels of funding are inequitable and whether inequity correlates to diminished quality of service for staff and learners.
  2. To review the current model of funding for Library and Knowledge Services across the NHS in England to determine if the model offers optimum value for money for HEE and NHS bodies.
  3. To present alternative funding models and identify all those organisations which could be co-funding services to reduce inequity and best support the implementation of Knowledge for Healthcare.

The work will answer the following questions:

  • Does the current model result in best use of resources?
  • What alternative models are there?
  • Which NHS bodies does HEE need to work with?
  • Which other non-NHS bodies does HEE need to work with?
  • What can be learned from existing data?
  • What is the relationship between funding and compliance with the NHS Library Quality Assurance Framework (LQAF)?

The work will be guided by the HEE Library and Knowledge Services Leads Equitable Funding Task and Finish Group with Linda Ferguson acting as project manager and is planned to complete in September 2016.

Members of the Task and Finish Group

Helen Bingham – HEE South

Andrew Brown – Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust

Rachel Cooke – Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust

Linda Ferguson (Chair) – HEE North linda.ferguson@nhs.net

Louise Goswami – HEE Kent Surrey and Sussex

Charlie Leppington – Imperial College London

Richard Marriott – HEE East Midlands

With support from Sue Lacey-Bryant, Senior Advisor, Knowledge for Healthcare