Tag Archives: Impact

What makes a good impact case study?

What is this resource?

This resource has been created in response to the demand from colleagues who have experienced difficulties in putting together a good impact case study.

The resource consists of:

  1. series of examples of impact case studies
  2. the checklist used by our regional impact reviewers
  3. an audio-video file exploring each case study in turn
How to use the resource

We recommend that you first download the example impact case studies and the review form and work through the case studies yourself using the checklist.

For each case study determine whether you think it meets the three core criteria and the additional criteria identified on the checklist.

Then view the presentation and compare our views to your findings.

Resources:

 

If you are unable to access YouTube within your organisation a copy of the presentation is available and can be viewed alongside the narrative above.

 

Impact Case Studies:

Advice around obtaining figures for cost savings

There are currently over 250 impact case studies on the Knowledge for Healthcare listing. Many of these mention savings in terms of clinical and managerial staff time, and financial savings.  Very few of these, however, provide actual figures in terms of financial savings.

Such figures are, however, invaluable in adding to the weight of the impact case when used for national advocacy purposes.  It was decided to investigate the services who had successfully obtained financial figures for their case studies to determine whether there are any useful lessons or advice which can be shared for others trying to replicate their success.

Responses

Eight services were identifies as having submitted one or more case studies providing details of cost savings achieved.  These services were approached for details of any techniques, learning, and/or advice for colleagues wishing to replicate the success.

Seven services responded to this enquiry:

  • Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (Michael Reid)
  • Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust (Ben Skinner)
  • Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust (Sarah Lewis)
  • Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (Uma Devalapalli)
  • Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (Sarah Gardner)
  • George Elliot Hospital NHS Trust (Stephen Ayre)
  • Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Trust (Alex Williams)

Their notes, advice and reflections have been collated into a short report.

Summary

Key points from the above:

  • Those who have received services from the library are often keen to help.  Maximise this opportunity if you can.
  • Involvement with projects supported by a search from the start can provide greater insights into the impact of the work.  Make the most of such involvement.
  • Using and analysing a questionnaire can provide signposts to those cases worthy of further investigation.
  • Allow time for financial savings to have been realised before following up
  • Use the personal approach where possible and interview colleagues to allow for focused probing with regard to details of financial savings.
  • Be flexible with the questions you ask and tailor the interview to the situation for best results.  This includes the language chosen.

While recognising that collecting data on financial savings can often be complex and challenging, we would encourage you to make use of the advice and learning included in the report when tackling impact in your own organisation.

You may also be interested to watch out for the latest paper on the NHS Clinical Librarianship study which is due to be published soon.   

Impact Reminder and Update

A number of colleagues have asked for a reminder about the processes for submitting impact case studies, and around vignettes and social cards.  Therefore, this blog serves as both a reminder and an introduction for colleagues new to the process.

Impact Toolkit

The Knowledge for Healthcare Blog includes a Value and Impact Toolkit which includes links to the national Generic Impact Survey.  We recommend that services use these core questions in their own local surveys and from time to time we will ask colleagues to share your data with HEE LKS Leads so that we can collate it nationally.

You will also find an interview template on the blog which may be useful in gathering qualitative impact data from library and knowledge service users.  An Impact Case Study template provides a resource for collating the key details from the interview. 

Services are then encouraged to submit completed case studies through the blog.  These are reviewed by teams of LKS colleagues from across the country and, where they meet the key criteria, added to the blog.

While you are not obliged to use the Impact Case Study template, you may find it easier to do so.  It has been designed in such a way as to encourage you to meet the criteria used for review later. Therefore if you use an alternative format we would encourage you to look at the criteria to make sure you are capturing the key elements in your narrative.

What happens after submission?

Once you have submitted your case study these are periodically sent to LKS colleagues for review against the criteria.  If they meet the three core criteria of clarity around what has been achieved, the impact involved, and the role of the library, then they are added to the Case Studies listing on the blog.

We encourage services to include quotes from named library champions in case studies.  If this is present, and if there is detail of cost or time savings, or similar high-level impact, then these case studies are developed into impact vignettes.  The impact vignettes are shared on the blog and also fed back to the service which submitted the corresponding case study and the local HEE LKS Leads.

What if I want to create my own vignette?

Templates for the development of vignettes and social cards have been made available on the blog.  These are intended for local use by your service in developing promotional tools.  You do not need to send any locally created vignettes to us via the blog because, where appropriate, we will develop these from your reviewed case studies.

What is the difference between a vignette and a social card?

The vignettes feature headlines, summaries and quotes about impact case studies whereas the social cards feature senior leaders endorsing #AMillionDecisions, providing a photograph and quote about the role of librarians and knowledge specialists in enabling the use of evidence and knowledge to inform decisions. ​