Tag Archives: Impact

Value and Impact Toolkit Roll-Out

Work is now well underway to roll out the Value and Impact Toolkit with introductory sessions being held across the country.  If you have not had the opportunity to attend one in your area why not ask your Library and Knowledge Service Lead about any plans to host a session locally.

Members of the Task and Finish Group will also be present at the Health Libraries Group Conference in Scarborough where delegates will have an opportunity to attend a workshop themed around the toolkit.

Our aim is to continuously improve the toolkit and to achieve this we need your feedback as users of the resource.  You will find a “contact us” link on each page of the toolkit which we would encourage you to use to suggest improvements, report any problems you experience, or simply to tell us about your experiences of using the resource.

We hope to make using the toolkit and sharing the outputs with the wider Library and Knowledge community as simple as possible. The Task and Finish Group is exploring various options in achieving this, including streamlining ways to for local services to submit generic impact questionnaire results and locally collected impact case studies.

As a first step in this direction we are able to share a copy of the Generic Impact Questionnaire to any service with a paid subscription to SurveyMonkey.  We anticipate that this will save services time inputting the survey locally.  To take advantage of this offer please contact Jenny Turner.

Dominic Gilroy

On behalf of the Value and Impact Task and Finish Group

Launch of the Value and Impact Toolkit

We are very pleased to announce the launch of the refreshed Value & Impact toolkit, which is now available for use on the HEE Knowledge for Healthcare Blog.

One of the refreshed tools is a short, generic questionnaire for use in any healthcare sector. There is now a new reference guide to support identification of the best tool and approach for the type of value or impact data you want to collect.

Thanks and congratulations to all involved, including the Value and Impact Task and Finish Group and their reference group; the Quality and Impact Working group; and everyone who contributed evidence and ideas.

Development work by the Task and Finish group will continue until March 2017, and feedback is very welcome as the aim is to embed the tools into day-to-day practice.

Jenny Turner – Chair of the Value and Impact Task and Finish Group
Clare Edwards – Chair of the Quality and Impact Working Group

Part of Something Bigger – What it is to be an information professional

After many years as a public librarian, I moved into a new role at CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals) working between the institute and employers in our profession. Having been public library focussed, I am now discovering our broad and beautiful profession as a whole. Much of my time and attention has been on Information and Knowledge Management, particularly in Government and Health.

When looking at the broader library and information profession, it is natural to look for the cross-sector similarities and differences. Whilst I recognise the differences, as my knowledge increases, I see more and more similarities. What unites us as a profession applies as much in health as it does in Government or public libraries. In my opinion, the following four common themes apply across the profession.

Information to our end user: Organisations rely on having the best available information accessible in an efficient way to inform decision making. This clearly applies in clinical decision making and in providing public patient information; however that end user could also be the financial director of a corporation or a public library customer or a commanding officer in the army. They rely on information professionals to provide accurate information in a timely way. Our ability to deliver that has great impact on the success of that organisation’s or individual’s outcomes.

Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB): CILIP’s PKSB is a framework that maps the essential skills and abilities across the profession. Whilst some sections apply more in certain sectors than others, the PKSB provides a comprehensive document to aid professional development and help information professionals to articulate both the broad and the deeply technical skills they hold. These skills are valuable and transferable. They will help us to adapt and evolve.

Professional ethics: Our professional ethics unite us across sectors. We endeavour to deliver the best possible services within our resources whilst balancing the needs of our employers and our users. We defend and advance access to information and demand the equitable treatment of information users. As a profession we understand the importance of impartiality, confidentiality and the integrity of information. All information professionals should be proud of these wide ranging and noble ethics.

Vulnerability to financial impact: This is certainly not limited to our profession, but we are all working in challenging financial times. The ability to advocate for the value of trained information professionals is essential across sectors. Being able to influence stakeholders about the importance of our roles and departments is clearly vital for us individually, but also for the benefit of the organisations as a whole. We add value and improve outcomes; we must equip ourselves to articulate this clearly. CILIP members will have access to the Impact Toolkit for this purpose, plus workforce mapping and commissioned research into the Value of Trained Library and Information Professionals has just been released.

Our skills are vital for an economy based on knowledge sharing. Change is inevitable and service development is essential. In response, we have to become increasingly adaptable and able to demonstrate our transferable skills. Continuing professional development and reflective practice are essential as we adapt to new roles in our sectors or even move into new ones. In this shifting environment, CILIP, as a professional body can act as a constant. It offers a core of professional ethics that apply across the board, a place to anchor your skills and abilities in the PKSB as a common framework, a way to have your professional development recognised in Professional Registration. It also offers the chance to be part of something bigger; a channel for central advocacy. I believe that raising the awareness of the value of information professionals in one sector acts to raise awareness for all. It provides a community and opportunities to help us be the fully-rounded professionals we all need to be as our services evolve.

Jo Cornish Development Officer (Employers) at CILIP