Tag Archives: IT

Homeworking and improving poor home WiFi

Like many of you, when COVID hit I was expected to work from home for much of my working week. I quickly put dibs on the dining room table. I borrowed a work laptop that had recently been upgraded to Windows 10, which meant that I could easily connect to my computer files and Trust’s intranet. I purchased a computer chair after a week or so of enduring what I once thought were comfortable dining chairs and an ergonomic mouse that stopped me from getting RSI. All sorted.

But there was one huge elephant in the room.

Poor wifi connection – lots of coverage blackspots and our devices regularly fell off the wifi connection. We live in a weirdly shaped bungalow – it’s very long, with rooms going off at strange angles and lots of thick walls in the way. The router was located at the very back of the house in an extension the previous owners had built, and it was on a separate electrical network. This is an important point for trying to sort out connectivity issues.

Ever since moving in, we’ve been trying to sort out this problem. I’ve spoken to our wifi providers – we’re on the fastest coverage possible for our area. I’ve spent a couple of evenings on the phone to them trying to tweak our set-up to get maximum oomph out of our connection, which included switching between different frequency channels depending on which ones were less well used at that particular point, and making sure there was nothing near it that could be stopping the signal etc. That didn’t make any difference.

We investigated and purchased a wi-fi extender. The first one we tried was a powerline adaptor – these devices use existing electrical wiring to transmit data between them and extend the reach of the wifi. This is when we discovered that our router is on a different electrical circuit to the rest of the house, so that didn’t work. We next tried a general wireless extender, which acts as a relay to re-broadcast the signal onwards to other parts of the house. This made a small improvement, but we still had blackspots and devices dropping off wifi and needed a separate password.

I investigated getting Virgin cable connected to our house. Note to self – never, ever purchase a house on a private road which can only be accessed via another private road. The Virgin technician very cheerfully told me I was a hiding to nothing there as I needed written permission from every home owner to say that they could tunnel under the roads, and did I have any inkling of the costs involved.

A colleague mentioned to me that they had purchased a more expensive router which had sorted out their issues. Upon further investigation (I really recommend the free articles on the Which website), I came across the idea of mesh routers. These are a network of hubs or satellites – one of them plugs into your existing modem (these days your router is often a combined router/modem) and the others are placed strategically around your house (we have our second hub in the loft). They are a more expensive solution but they have worked brilliantly for us. No more blackspots, no more dropping off wifi. I can get connectivity from any corner of the house. Most importantly, we can now watch television over the internet with zero buffering!

Before purchasing anything as expensive as mesh routers, do your research. Check that the one you are planning on purchasing will be powerful enough for your size of house. Check that it really will eliminate all blackspots if this is your issue and how many devices it supports. I recommend Techradar as a good place to start; they also cover Black Friday deals if you fancy a bargain.

Catherine Micklethwaite
South Devon Healthcare Library Service
catherine.micklethwaite@nhs.net

Knock, Knock …. Or possibly Open Sesame ?

November 16, 2015, Knowledge for Healthcare Authentication Task and Finish Group, Stewart House, London.

On a beautiful November day a group of people from NICE, HEE, the NHS and JISC met in Stewart House across the road from the little park in Russell Square (the park has a really lovely café run by an Italian family and you can sit out and watch the squirrels in the middle of London!).

We came together to talk about how to make it as easy as possible for NHS staff to get into all the articles and databases and books and the as yet undreamt of apps and resources of the future.  These tools of Evidence Based Practice have been paid for ultimately by the state.  However, it comes as no surprise to those involved in provision, that ensuring ease of access to the goods can be difficult !

  • How can we mandate IT managers in every NHS Trust to use the same, up to date browsers, firewall white lists and allowable electronic resources?
  • How do we ensure we can all use a super-fast, wide open bandwidth to do the same?
  • How do we standardise, streamline and make transparent all routes to all paid for resources?

The answer is – we can’t!   However, in the absence of the equivalent of a lottery win, what we can do is create a group that reflects on and draws upon best practice across the NHS in England, integrating suppliers and technology strands to create the best rope bridges to allow our readers to cross over to the promised treasure chest of gold standard evidence that is theirs for the asking.   And so we begin … “ Knock, Knock … may we come in?”

We are  –  Sarah Massey (NHS/Chair), Linda Mace-Michalik (NHS), Hannah Prince (NHS),  Helga Perry (NHS), Richard Osborn (HEE), Moira Godbert Laird (NICE), Michael Heath (NICE) and Josh Howlett (JISC).

We have set ourselves the following tasks  –  draw up Terms of reference; identify stakeholders and communications; scope current methods of access; understand the current NHS network spine;  pilot improved access routes; create a risk log; assist in AIMS reprocurement and developments of the openathens registration form