Tag Archives: knowledge management

The Seven Deadly Sins of Knowledge Sharing in Networks

On 16th July, I was fortunate enough to take part in this webinar organised by NHS England’s Sustainable Improvement Team and Source4Networks, which posed the  following questions:

  • What are the barriers to sharing knowledge across your networks?
  • How can we learn from others to apply this knowledge to the NHS?

Chris Collison, author and expert in networks and knowledge management, was on hand to guide us through some of these critical barriers, namely the seven deadly sins – or syndromes – that can affect networks and stifle the supply or demand for knowledge sharing.

1) Tall Poppy Syndrome – Based on the idea that the tallest poppy in a field is the first to get cut down to size, this syndrome illustrates a reluctance to put your head above the parapet and a tendency to keep a low profile and not get involved.

2) Shrinking Violet Syndrome – Another “sin” that stifles the supply of shared knowledge in a network, based on a feeling of false humility, and that you have nothing useful to share.

3) Not-Invented-Here Syndrome – This syndrome impacts the demand for knowledge
sharing; the view that your organisation or team has a unique set of problems that can’t be
fixed by adopting other people’s solutions. Besides (the thinking goes) why use someone
else’s solutions when you can gain kudos for inventing your own?

4) Tom Tom Syndrome – Also known as Real-Men-Don’t-Ask-For-Directions Syndrome. A
reluctance to ask for help when you’re lost, due to a fear of being seen to be incompetent.
This “muddling along” approach is another barrier that stifles knowledge sharing by reducing demand.

5) Lacknowledgement Syndrome – The perception that by sharing good practice there is
somehow a “lack of acknowledgement”, and a suspicion that someone else will take the
credit for your hard work.

6) Lock-it-Away Syndrome – Here, a potential solution, idea or example of good practice is
not shared, either because it is never quite finished, or because everything produced by the organisation or team is locked down by default due to security policies.

7) Hamster-on-the-Wheel Syndrome – This “sin” comes down to time – or lack of it. A feeling that you’re just too busy going round in circles to stop and share what you’re doing.

A quick webinar poll indicated that this last “sin” was particularly prevalent, and something that most of the attendees were familiar with, but we all recognised the various other syndromes as well. Chris went on to suggest some antidotes, such as:

  • Make it safe to share
  • Think about use of language – e.g. looking for “answers” can place an unintended
    burden on people
  • Establish what “good” looks like, so the network has a frame of reference – e.g. using
    a maturity model for an agreed scale of good practice
  • Make it easier for people to ask for help – e.g. awards for things like:
    o Transferring good practice
    o Re-using a solution
    o Embedding a good practice
  • Share failures as well as successes
  • Acknowledge everything – where it came from etc.
  • Check what security policies actually say about sharing information outside the
    organisation
  • Legitimise the time spent sharing knowledge, e.g.
    o Establish a network sponsor
    o Find and share stories of things that worked

From my experience, we already have many of these antidotes in place in our LKS network in the South, but we all interact with networks at an organisational or directorate level, and personally I recognised quite a few of these deadly syndromes. I found the webinar
extremely illuminating,engaging and motivating.

For anyone interested in viewing the recorded webinar, you can find it here. For those of you who would like to dig a bit deeper, both Chris Collison’s and Source4Networks’ websites and twitter details are below:

Chris Collison: www.chriscollison.com / @chris_collison
Source4Networks: https://www.source4networks.org.uk/ / @source4networks

Andrew Brown
Library Services Manager
Wexham Park Hospital (WXM)

This article was first published in Swimming Pool, Issue 109, August 2018, p.7-10

How can I get hold of a copy of the Evidence and Knowledge Self-Assessment Tool aka “The Board Tool”?

Visit this dedicated page to access a copy of the Evidence and Knowledge Self-Assessment Tool.

The page also has links to guidance documents; a webinar about using the tool; an editable Section 4  – Priorities and Planning for you to add your own local examples;  an example of a completed tool after use with a fictional transformation team; and some contacts for people across regions who may be able to help you get started with using the Tool.

Why is it no longer known simply as the “Board Tool”?

The Tool is great to use with executive teams, to fully consider how well evidence and knowledge are being used in an organisation and to identify opportunities for developments.  However the Tool has wider applications than just being used with Board members of an organistion, this is why we have changed the name.  In fact we would recommend that you start using the Tool  with a department or team that knows your services well and with whom you can work to create an action plan to help them use evidence and knoweldge even more effectively to meet their team objectives.   Some services have also used the Tool as a starting place to develop local library and knowledge service strategy and planning documents or to scope an enhanced service.

How have you used the Tool?

Use the comments section to tell us how you have made use of the Tool.  For some, the immediate response from having a conversation about the Tool has not led to a full action plan but after a period of time there has been greater uptake in existing services such as evidence-requests by the individuals who took part.

Feel you need more information and help with using the Tool in your organiastion?

We are currently preparing some refresher sessions:  an introduction to the Tool which will be included in the four regional training events being held in September promoting #Knowvember2018  and some more in-depth sessions looking at engagement and exploring the Tool in more detail in Winter/Spring.  Please let us know what else you would like included?

on behalf of the Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge Work Stream, Knowledge for Healthcare HEE.knowledgeforhealthcare@nhs.net

Knowing me, knowing you – there is something we can do… #Knowvember18

Knowvember 2018 – what, why, when???

Knowledge management.

Do those 2 words make your heart sing or weep?

Are you an active KM-er, keen but not quite sure how to get involved and do more, or an absolute beginner?

Either way, we* want you!!

We’re coordinating a knowledge management campaign which will take place throughout November 2018 (November… Knowvember… you see?!). The idea is to highlight and showcase the ways in which library and knowledge services can and do promote and mobilise evidence and organisational knowledge.

What does the Knowvember campaign involve?

There are 3 elements: pledging to get involved, support for you in the run up to Knowvember, and then the KM activity in November itself.

Pledging

Between now and November, we are encouraging you to pledge to carry out a KM activity within your organisation at some point in November. Which activity you choose is up to you – you could start small with something within your service (for example, a lessons learned review of a project), offer to facilitate something for another team or department, or go for something bigger like a knowledge cafe or a randomised coffee trial. There are lots of resources on the knowledge management toolkit pages to give you some ideas.

You can pledge in different ways:

  • There is an online option, using Padlet, which we’re encouraging you to use. On the site, you can see what other people have pledged, and make your own, without needing to login or create an account. It’s really easy – just click on the + in the pink circle at the bottom right hand corner of the page. Then add a title, your pledge, and your name and organisation. You can upload a photo as well.
  • Alternatively, you’ll be able to email your pledge for us to add to the list.
  • You’ll also be able to pledge in person at HLG (where we’re having a poster, so come and see us!) and at the events we’re running in September (see below).

Pledging just involves giving your name, organisation and what you’re planning on doing, or just your support for the campaign. This will help us to follow-up after Knowvember, and see what impact the campaign has had.

Support for getting involved

We’re holding 4 events in September which we hope will inspire you to get involved. The events will showcase KM activity that’s already going on in your region, and give you the opportunity to ask questions and find out more. They will also include the opportunity to take part in some KM activities, so that you can see how easy it is to run them, and how valuable they can be.

The events are free, and are open to all LKS staff. We’re holding one in each region:

North: Leeds, Thursday 13 September

Midlands and East: Leicester, Tuesday 18 September

South: Exeter, Wednesday 5 September

London and Kent, Surrey and Sussex: London, Wednesday 12 September

You can book into whichever event is easiest for you to get to, regardless of which region you’re in. The booking form is now open.

We’ll also be working with the lovely #ukmedlibs people to run a Twitter chat in October (16th), to encourage and inspire you to take part in the campaign.

Knowvember itself

We’re encouraging everyone involved to tweet about their activities during the month, using the hashtag #Knowvember18.

We’ll be organising a Thunderclap to help promote the campaign that we’ll be asking you to support.

Once you’ve carried out your KM event or activity, we’d be grateful if you could let us know, so that we can evaluate how successful the campaign has been. We’ll circulate a quick survey at the end of Knowvember to all those who pledged to join in.

Keep an eye out for our tweets and updates – and if you’d like any more information in the meantime, please contact knowvember@libraryservices.nhs.uk.

*We are a project group on the HEE/CILIP Leadership Development Programme 2017-18:

Clare Crowley, Natalie Gabe, Charlotte Greaves, Bennet Jones, Susannah Keill, Deborah Lepley, Hong-Anh Nguyen, Katie Nicholas, Preeti Puligari, David Watson, Fran Wilkie