Tag Archives: mobilising knowledge

KM to KM – Knowledge Management to Knowledge Mobilisation: a trend?

A reflection from David Stewart

“Knowledge Management (KM), what’s that then?” A question I used to dread. That “crunch” moment in the lift when a very senior person asks you a question that really takes more than 30 seconds to answer. I had never heard of knowledge management until the later 1990s; it certainly did not feature in my librarianship course in 1981, but then neither did computers!

Once I heard the term, I started to try to find out more. There was a bewildering array of theoretical articles some of which promised to supercharge our workplace; others were very dismissive; “knowledge can’t be managed” I collected them together and soon had two box files full and was none the wiser. Then someone pointed me to a local academic, Dr Jim Hughes at Salford University who was lecturing in KM. Jim ran a whole series of seminars for North West NHS librarians in the early 2000s, helping us to understand where it came from and what it might be. We also worked with Dr Chris Mimnagh, a GP and commissioner who was very enthusiastic about the potential of KM. Chris now works with The Innovation Agency in the North West.

Over the next fifteen years KM appeared to come and go, sometimes being treated as a “nice to have” and not a priority in financially constrained times. Nevertheless, it became an important strand as we wrote and published Knowledge for Healthcare in December 2014. The Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge workstream has been our programme for bringing Knowledge Management to the centre of our offer into the healthcare system. This firmly twins our long-established role in disseminating and providing access to evidence from research and practice with a corporate responsibility to better manage and use knowledge and shared learning.

Five years on, and reviewing what we have achieved, I believe we have moved significantly on the KM front. Almost all NHS library and knowledge services (note that we now refer to knowledge services  as an integral part of our function) have been able to demonstrate, via their Library Quality Assurance Framework (LQAF) returns, that they are actively involved in some aspect of KM within their trust. We have recently published a new edition of the KM Framework postcards describing learning before, during and after techniques; more and more of us can run a knowledge café and understand what the goldfish bowl technique is. More NHS organisations are using the Health Education England self-assessment tool to assess how well they are using evidence and organisational knowledge, working with health library and knowledge specialists to prioritise KM activities.  We are about to initiate market research on potential demand for an e-qualification in KM for NHS staff.

I believe we are in a very different KM space than even five years ago. Listen to my recent Webinar on the background and context of Quality and Improvement Outcome Four of the new Quality and Improvement Outcomes Framework where I say that KM “will become the every-day core of what we do” – delivering Knowledge and Library Services to ensure that organisational knowledge and best evidence are mobilised to achieve excellent healthcare and health improvement.

David Stewart, Head of Library and Knowledge Services North, Directorate of Innovation and Transformation, Health Education England

 

 

Happy KNOWvember19

Don’t forget to use the month of November as your opportunity to showcase all that you do to mobilise evidence and knowledge. Have you held a Randomised Coffee Trial, contributed to keeping guidelines updated, organised a Peer Assist or held a Retrospect? Share what you have been doing, or plan to do, with your organisation and colleagues via social media using the hashtag KNOWvember2019.

Share your story

Jason, winner of a copy of the KM Cookbook, replied to the earlier post explaining how his team have run After Action Reviews to review eLearning sessions for F1 doctors.

Lola and Lisa are busy preparing their third and fourth rounds of Randomised Coffee Trials for their organisations. Feedback to date has been positive:

Susan has been busy planing several knowledge mobilisation activities including launching a systems leadership community of practice and supporting “live event” video capture and dissemination, including sharing the CEO Team Briefs.

Sarah has been holding knowledge cafes for her organisation – see what her Deputy Director of Strategy, Daniel Leveson has to say about taking part in a knowledge cafe

Find out what other teams have done by checking out the KM Stories and consider submitting your own.

6 ways to refresh your own knowledge in November

  1. Find out how the knowledge mobilisation framework can support workforce development by watching this HEE STAR TV episode featuring Louise Goswami.

2. Take a look at the new techniques added to the NHS Knowledge Mobilisation Framework postcard set

3. Take a lunch and learn session by watching one of our four new bite-sized introductions to knowledge mobilisation techniques and consider how you can use your existing enquiries to introduce some knowledge mobilisation techniques in your organisation

4. Get inspired by what someone else has done – read a knowledge management story

5. Join the KM community of practice or if you are already a member post a question or share something you have been doing

6. Take part in the #ukmedlibs Twitter Chat Tuesday 19th November, 12:30 – 13:30 with special guest Denise Carter, Chair of the CILIP Knowledge & Information Management Specialist Interest Group. This will be a great opportunity to find out more about working in a different sector, ask questions about CILIP’s Knowledge Management Chartership process and discuss the ISO Knowledge Management Standard.

So, please enjoy KNOWvember19 and don’t forget to share what you are doing.

The Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge Group

Knowledge Mobilisation Framework E-Learning is now LIVE

Following an official launch on Wednesday, the Knowledge Mobilisation Framework E-Learning is now live on the E-learning for Healthcare Platform.

Participants at the #Knowvember18 Training Event  in Exeter on the 5th September celebrating the launch of the updated Knowledge Mobilisation Framework E-Learning Modules and associated quick reference cards.

The modules introduce eleven knowledge mobilisation techniques that can be used by the wider health workforce  to learn before, during and after a piece of work to help to replicate good practice and avoid pitfalls.  Accompanying the modules are the updated Knowledge Mobilisation Framework Postcards.

Enrolling on the programme is quick and easy  and enables you to record your progress or alternatively you can choose to access freely as a guest.

A choosing tool has been developed to help you to select the right technique for a given situation or you can browse, working through all eleven modules or dipping in and out to suit your own circumstances.

Further publicity will take place throughout the autumn but for now we are calling on all Library and Knowledge Service Staff to promote the modules and use of the techniques locally within their organisations.

Feel free to use the flyer, which also features the How to Search the Literature Effectively: a Step by Step Guide to Success E-Learning modules, and share the link widely:

https://www.e-lfh.org.uk/programmes/knowledge-mobilisation-framework/

For further information about the modules, the quick reference cards, the techniques featured or #Knowvember18 please contact a member of the Knowledge for Healthcare Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge Workstream Group:

louise.goswami@hee.nhs.uk

sue.lacey-bryant@hee.nhs.uk

alison.day12@nhs.net