Tag Archives: Paraprofessional Staff

Build your leadership skills with the NHS Leadership Academy

If you are looking to build your leadership skills in a health and care context, at your own pace, while being part of a supportive online community, the Edward Jenner Programme from the NHS Leadership Academy could be for you.

Aimed at staff fairly new to leadership, the programme is open to everyone, working at any level, in a health and social care context and offers a first step into leadership. The learning offers a mix of theory and practice delivered online and can therefore be undertaken at a time and place suited your needs.  Furthermore, as it is an NHS course, the examples provided are NHS specific and therefore easier to relate to our own work.

Colleagues who serve NHS staff but are employed by Higher Education Institutions or Local Authorities are equally welcome to sign up.

The programme is made up of three elements:

  • Launch – offers and introduction to leadership and a chance for self-reflection.  It is designed to take about 5 hours to complete
  • Foundations – offers more about the theory and practice of leadership with real-life examples taken from health and social care.

Both these elements are free to access and undertaken online through a mixture of film, activities and discussions.   Following completion of the Foundation module participants are invited to complete a short written piece reflecting on learning from the programme which results in being entered for a NHS Leadership Academy award in Leadership Foundations.

For those who complete Launch and Foundations and wish to go further with the programme a third module is available.

  • Advanced – offers further online learning and three face-to-face one-day workshops, taking around three months to complete.

Unlike the first two modules which are free to complete, this module incurs a fee of £350.

If you are interested why not view further details on the NHS Leadership Academy website and talk to your line manager about signing up?

On behalf of the Workforce Planning and Development Group

A force to be reckoned with – the NHS LKS workforce

The implementation of Knowledge for Healthcare calls for flexible, multi-skilled knowledge specialists – and we know that our staff are our greatest asset.

It is the expertise of qualified librarians and information specialists, together with our colleagues on the front line of NHS funded library service points, who can make all the difference in bringing knowledge to bear on learning, research, decision-making and innovation. The principles and values defined within the development framework shape our workforce planning and development agenda. It signals skills and experience set to become ever more important.

Focussed on issues around Workforce Planning and Development, this blog is one to watch.

As Chair of the working group which oversees this part of the implementation plan, I am delighted that this key area has attracted highly experienced volunteers from across the profession to help us get this right for the future. The working group members are:

David Stewart – Director of Health Libraries North

Sue Lacey Bryant – Advisor to the Knowledge for Healthcare Programme

Anthea Sutton – Senior Information Specialist, ScHARR, University of Sheffield

Gary Sutton – Library Manager, Warrington & Halton Hospital NHS FT

Simon Edwards – Head of Professional Development, CILIP

Sharon Markless – Senior Lecturer in Education, King’s College London

Gil Young (working group secretary) – CPD & Partnerships Manager, NW Health Care Libraries Unit

Meeting for the first time in May 2015, the group has set up three initial ‘task and finish’ groups (TAFs) so far to work on specific time-limited project groups. Each is made up of volunteers from NHS LKS staff. These TAFs will:

  • develop a set of core competencies for health LKS staff, building on CILIP’s PKSB

Chair: Mary Hill, Christie Hospital

  • define a core national curriculum – setting priorities for ongoing training to meet the needs of future service delivery

Chair: Hugh Hanchard, South Tees Hospitals

  • Launch an online learning zone of resources and career opportunities for library staff

Chair: Paula Elliott, Bolton Hospital

We know that continuing professional development is essential for members of our small, specialised workforce to be able to ensure that they have the right expertise and experience to take the opportunities that lie ahead. We know too that the leaders of tomorrow’s library and knowledge services are already part of today’s workforce. So, in addition to setting up our task and finish groups we have:

  • Commissioned a Talent Management Toolkit

Building on the existing toolkit, this will underpin the conversations we need to have, and development activity we need to undertake, to open up opportunities for career progression and ensure robust succession planning

  • Started to develop a leadership programme

Working closely with CILIP, we are shaping an introductory leadership programme for library managers and their deputies or assistants. Strengthening capacity and capability to deliver Knowledge for Healthcare , this will also serve to build leadership skills amongst those wanting to take on more senior roles in the future.

As you can see, there is a great deal happening and this is only year one of our five-year programme! More news to follow in further postings.

You are invited to get involved. To find out more, and if you have any questions please email me at david.stewart@nhs.net

David Stewart

Director of Health Libraries North

Innovation at the frontline by Sue Lacey Bryant

Listening in on 90 people in the room at the Summer Conference of the East of England Health Libraries Network, focused on spreading innovation, there was a real buzz. With library assistants bringing their experience to the table, alongside librarians and knowledge specialists, as we discussed priorities for workforce development, there was a rich dialogue.

Indeed, we all know that the Frontline is key – and prize high standards of customer service. So, our focus is on shaping a national approach that addresses workforce development priorities for all NHS funded library and knowledge staff.

The Frontline is the Key

Our library and knowledge services aspire to ensuring that NHS bodies, their staff, learners, patients and the public use the right knowledge and evidence, at the right time, in the right place, enabling high quality decision-making, learning, research and innovation to achieve excellent healthcare and health improvement.

Listening to, and building on, the day to day experience of team members on the frontline will be crucial in planning and making changes to the way we work, in order to realise this vision.

We see exciting opportunities for all library and knowledge staff to innovate, enlarge and extend their roles. The ambition to up-skill our paraprofessional staff, expanding roles to take further responsibility in supervisory work, customer care and oversight of back-office functions, is absolutely explicit in Knowledge for Healthcare (page 39).

We also recognise that, as library and knowledge services are modernised, greater investment will be needed to support the development of first contact healthcare knowledge assistants. That’s staff in Bands 2-4 to you and me. (page 40)]

The best numbers we have are that there are 438 WTE paraprofessional staff working in NHS funded healthcare libraries in England, and that right now some 29% hold a vocational qualification. One of the things to explore is how we want to see that changing going forward?

Please look out for communications out through the LETB leads, as we look to recruit paraprofessional colleagues to join our work on the various Task and Finish groups focussed on workforce matters.

Sue Lacey Bryant
Senior Advisor, Knowledge for Healthcare, Health Education England

  1. laceybryant@clara.co.uk
  2. 07773477552

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