Tag Archives: repository

It’s Open Access Week!

This year’s theme is particularly pertinent for us in health, and what better time to share with you developments in our network

Open Access Community of Practice

The Community of Practice is made up of 30 health librarians from across England, largely from the NHS but also the Kings Fund and Public Health England.

The group first met in May 2019 in London and participated in a programme of speakers including Kathryrn Funk from NLM; Frank Norman from the Crick Institute; and Sara Gould from the British Library.

We discussed and agreed upon what the priorities of the group should be and from this 3 sub-groups have been set up:

  • Repositories
  • Educational Resources for Open Access
  • A User experience piece of work to identify the motivations for NHS staff to engage with Open Access

The group also meet virtually on Webex sessions and a dedicated SharePoint site and associated e-mail list provides member profiles, space to share and work collaboratively on documents, and a central place to pool together our learning and discussions.

Members of the group have expressed a range of reasons for being part of this community of practice, from being:

 “keen to learn from colleagues on this group”

to knowing “how others have experienced managing organisational repositories to help inform the development of our digital archive.”

to having “a keen interest in grey literature – how to capture and promote unpublished works”

and being motivated by addressing how we “could make NHS research more accessible/visible, thus enhancing impact”

Interested in being involved?  Please contact helene.gorring@hee.nhs.uk

Plan S – big changes in publishing ahead

Plan S was launched in September 2018 and is a renewed and much bolder initiative to make all publicly funded research open access. The initial deadline for this was 1 January 2020, but based on feedback submitted, it has now been extended to 2021.

It calls for:

  • all research to be made immediately and completely available on publication, either in a compliant open access journal or an open access platform – no embargoes, no hybrid publishing.
  • any publication fees to be paid by the research funder or the author’s university (not by individuals) and for these fees will be standardised across Europe and be capped.

Other key principles of Plan S are that:

  • Authors retain copyright of their publications and impose no restrictions (preferably using Creative Commons licences)
  • Universities, research organisations and libraries align their policies and strategies
  • The funders will establish criteria for Open Access journals and platforms, and provide incentives to establish these were they do not currently exist and the funders will sanction non-compliance.

How do we get ready?

In order to transition to open access, ‘transformative agreements’ need to be in place – a contract between libraries and publishers providing a shift between the traditional subscription model and open access publishing.  

We are liaising with Information Power Ltd who have been commissioned by the Wellcome to deliver on Plan S, to identify how we can gain traction with transformative agreements for the NHS. 

During their project, Information Power identified a specific challenge that will hinder the ability of some health journals to make a full transition to open access unless it is addressed, that being that journals with a high proportion of authors based in clinical settings (i.e the NHS) will struggle to successfully transition because these authors will not have access to funding for Article Processing Charges, they will not be covered by university transformative agreements, and nor is it a widespread practice for clinicians to share full-text via repositories.

Find out more on our revamped Open Access pages

Helene Gorring, Health Education England

3 ways – the creation of an institutional repository

The beginning

From the perspective of someone still in the early stages of setting up an institutional repository (IR) at Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, I would recommend checking out the IR toolkit on the KfH website, which contains loads of hints, tips and case studies, and I also picked up some great ideas from the #ukmedlibs chat on IRs on 16th January (transcription available here). To try and establish the scope of the IR, I’ve been having ongoing conversations with colleagues in R&D, Practice Development, and Clinical Education regarding requirements and content, and there are a range of potential platforms to consider, limited at this stage to existing systems in the trust (e.g. SharePoint) and free software such as Zotero. Andrew Brown

The middle

Oxford Health Foundation Trust Libraries (OHFT)have just signed an agreement with KnowledgeArc to host a repository to launch soon. The 2017 Sally Hernando awards highlighted this company as providers of the ‘ORDA’ repository shared by 5 Derbyshire Trusts. We found their model most suitable for us; affordable but offering the full functionality of DSpace, open source repository software.

We met with staff from key departments in our Trust; R&D, Comms, Clinical Audit, Learning & Development, and IT.  All were supportive; recognising the benefits of providing access to Trust authored publications as well as sharing knowledge about OHFT initiatives. The Trust web developer played a key role in our group, providing technical advice and assessment of the various options considered.

RDE and Derbyshire Hospitals were very helpful in sharing their valuable experience and knowledge with us.

Getting to this point took rather a long time. Next steps are to decide on a suitable name (!) and set up our communities/collections. Sarah Maddock

 

The end

Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust (AWP) has set up a digital repository using SharePoint.

Why SharePoint?

  • Facilitates collaborative working
  • Simulates database functions “Lists”
  • Offers flexibility and can present information in different ways for different user requirements “Views”

Lists

  • SharePoint is organised within lists and these function in a similar way to spreadsheets.
  • Lists are a very effective way to manage, store and manipulate information. Details of staff research and publications are held in a spreadsheet imported into a list.

Views

  • The repository has several views that present different aspects of the data relating to the publications; ‘All Research’, ‘AWP Sponsored Research’ and ‘Systematic Reviews’ to a name a few.
  • The data that is presented within these ‘Views’ is filtered according to keywords in the columns within the ‘List’.

In the longer term, once the data has been cleansed, organised, and managed within SharePoint, it should be possible to present it for inclusion in a wider repository solution across the NHS Library, Knowledge, and Information community subject to the requirements of stakeholders here at AWP. Steven Walker

How an institutional repository can add value and enable organisational knowledge to be shared.

Every year the information analyst in our Research & Development (R&D) department would spend weeks combing through PubMed, searching for Trust authored publications, assembling incredibly long and complicated search strings, comparing results against spreadsheets of names of Trust researchers… then assembling a publications report to attach as an appendix to the annual R&D report to the Trust board, or a spreadsheet of figures to send off to funding bodies. Reports which would then disappear into filing cabinets, or creaky hard drives, never to see the light of day again…

Until R&D and the Library worked together to launched the institutional repository!

The repository serves a dual purpose:

Firstly, the publications data is collected, checked and added to the repository on a regular basis (by library staff), saving the R&D department literally “weeks of time” (direct quote from a very happy information analyst).

Secondly, the publication details are made freely available online – showcasing all the research that takes place in the Trust.

This data was already being collected, but placing it in the institutional repository added value to it by making it:

  • Visible, searchable, discoverable
  • Organised – by division, specialty or department
  • Shareable – easy to Tweet about new articles, embed RSS feeds of new articles into subject resource hubs/intranet
  • Connected – linking research articles to research projects on the Trust’s research information systems
  • Open Access – including full-text versions of articles within publisher’s permissions, or linking to articles on publisher’s sites.
  • Promotable – ability to create researcher profile pages listing publications (good for CVs!)
  • Patient engaging – research participants can see what has been published in the studies they have been a part of

Institutional repositories don’t have to be limited to just published journal articles, they can also include other organisational assets such as patient information leaflets, Trust reports and publications, conference posters, innovations…the possibilities are endless! Your IR can either be internal or external facing depending on the content (your innovations may be protected by intellectual property for example).

You don’t necessary need fancy technology to put together an institutional repository – it can be something as simple as a spreadsheet or a blog – any tool or mechanism you can use to capture and organise knowledge. If you’re thinking about starting an institutional repository, see the Knowledge for Healthcare Institutional Repository Toolkit for ideas, tips & hints and case studies.

Organising and mobilising knowledge is what we information professionals do best and institutional repositories are a great opportunity to develop and strengthen relationships with other departments in our organisations (we’re certainly working closer with R&D now!) and to demonstrate our skills and value, so go for it!

Cate Newell
Reader Services Librarian and RD&E Research Repository Manager
Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust