Tag Archives: research

Research as an enabler of Knowledge for Healthcare in 2020

What activities are we talking about when we describe research as an enabler of Knowledge for Healthcare? Fundamentally, there are two key dimensions: research that takes forward the ongoing development of the strategy; and resources to enable local health library and knowledge services staff to develop their research skills.

Health Education England has experience of funding specific research studies that inform understanding of the role that can be played by NHS library and knowledge services, such as a study of the clinical librarian role in the Wirral. We are building on this experience to work with a new Research Advisory Group on research developments from 2021 onwards.

 2020 Successes:

  • Two updates of the Research Toolkit developed originally by the former HEAlth information and Libraries for Education and Research group (HEALER), including new content on Open Access
  • Series of online workshops on different aspects of research and writing for publication
  • Commissioning and overseeing research into the measures we can use to assess the impact of knowledge mobilisation activities by NHS library and knowledge services staff
  • Establishing Research Advisory Group to provide expert advice on our research activity as part of Knowledge for Healthcare

Things to look out for in 2021:

  • Commissioning new research study into knowledge mobilisation
  • Further opportunities to develop your research thinking and skills

If you are interested in our research activity and would like to learn more or to be involved, do contact either Gil Young or Ruth Carlyle.

With best wishes for the festive season,
Ruth Carlyle

National LKS Website – User Research Update

As you will know, the HEE Library and Knowledge Services’ Resource Discovery Team has been conducting some further user research to establish your requirements for the planned national LKS website.  To this end we have:

  1. Conducted 19 one-to-one interviews with stakeholders, and end users for identified gaps
  2. Ran 2 x user needs face-to-face workshops with a range of stakeholders and end users in Leeds and London (February 1 and 25) to generate user personas and user journey scenarios.  Users were from all regions of the country working in a variety of professional and paraprofessional library and knowledge services’ roles
  3. Ran 1 x user needs virtual workshop with a range of end users (April 10) to generate user-personas and user journey scenarios
  4. Analysis of a user needs validation survey with 172 responses
  5. Analysis of a pre-user discovery phase website functionality needs survey with 199 responses
  6. Created and prioritised 37 user stories with the HEE team

May we say a big thank you to all of who contributed to this research.  The data gathered form all of this activity has been drawn together and a report produced summarising our conclusions.  The report, National Library and Knowledge Services Website: User Research can be found on the KfH blog under Resource Discovery | Websites for Library staff.

27 user needs for the national LKS website were identified and prioritised into Must Haves; Should Haves and Could Haves  Most needs based on the validation survey have been prioritised must haves.

Top needs for the site:

  • Act as for a single point of access to LKS documents and resources whether national or regional.
  • Have good search functionality and filtering.
  • Be easy to use, to be written in plain English and to be visually appealing.  It must be kept up to date.
  • Work within the constraints of the ICT systems and policies in use within local NHS Trusts
  • Work well on mobile devices as well as the desktop
  • Download and upload documentation from and to the site easily
  • Users are alerted to any new and modified content in which they are interested
  • Communities of practice and collaborative tools are important.
  • Support career development and induction of those new to the profession
  • Offer a range of communication tools so that users can find out what’s going on. This must include mailing lists.
  • Calendars of events filtered by region must be available.
  • Allow users to connect to peers, find mentors, coaches, collaborators and others with skills to facilitate learning

This research and the report has now been presented to the Digital Communications Team at HEE and we are meeting next week to discuss how best to start work on developing a national LKS website which meets these identified needs.

Richard Bridgen on behalf of the HEE LKS Resource Discovery Team

How an institutional repository can add value and enable organisational knowledge to be shared.

Every year the information analyst in our Research & Development (R&D) department would spend weeks combing through PubMed, searching for Trust authored publications, assembling incredibly long and complicated search strings, comparing results against spreadsheets of names of Trust researchers… then assembling a publications report to attach as an appendix to the annual R&D report to the Trust board, or a spreadsheet of figures to send off to funding bodies. Reports which would then disappear into filing cabinets, or creaky hard drives, never to see the light of day again…

Until R&D and the Library worked together to launched the institutional repository!

The repository serves a dual purpose:

Firstly, the publications data is collected, checked and added to the repository on a regular basis (by library staff), saving the R&D department literally “weeks of time” (direct quote from a very happy information analyst).

Secondly, the publication details are made freely available online – showcasing all the research that takes place in the Trust.

This data was already being collected, but placing it in the institutional repository added value to it by making it:

  • Visible, searchable, discoverable
  • Organised – by division, specialty or department
  • Shareable – easy to Tweet about new articles, embed RSS feeds of new articles into subject resource hubs/intranet
  • Connected – linking research articles to research projects on the Trust’s research information systems
  • Open Access – including full-text versions of articles within publisher’s permissions, or linking to articles on publisher’s sites.
  • Promotable – ability to create researcher profile pages listing publications (good for CVs!)
  • Patient engaging – research participants can see what has been published in the studies they have been a part of

Institutional repositories don’t have to be limited to just published journal articles, they can also include other organisational assets such as patient information leaflets, Trust reports and publications, conference posters, innovations…the possibilities are endless! Your IR can either be internal or external facing depending on the content (your innovations may be protected by intellectual property for example).

You don’t necessary need fancy technology to put together an institutional repository – it can be something as simple as a spreadsheet or a blog – any tool or mechanism you can use to capture and organise knowledge. If you’re thinking about starting an institutional repository, see the Knowledge for Healthcare Institutional Repository Toolkit for ideas, tips & hints and case studies.

Organising and mobilising knowledge is what we information professionals do best and institutional repositories are a great opportunity to develop and strengthen relationships with other departments in our organisations (we’re certainly working closer with R&D now!) and to demonstrate our skills and value, so go for it!

Cate Newell
Reader Services Librarian and RD&E Research Repository Manager
Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust