Knowing me, knowing you – there is something we can do… #Knowvember18

Knowvember 2018 – what, why, when???

Knowledge management.

Do those 2 words make your heart sing or weep?

Are you an active KM-er, keen but not quite sure how to get involved and do more, or an absolute beginner?

Either way, we* want you!!

We’re coordinating a knowledge management campaign which will take place throughout November 2018 (November… Knowvember… you see?!). The idea is to highlight and showcase the ways in which library and knowledge services can and do promote and mobilise evidence and organisational knowledge.

What does the Knowvember campaign involve?

There are 3 elements: pledging to get involved, support for you in the run up to Knowvember, and then the KM activity in November itself.

Pledging

Between now and November, we are encouraging you to pledge to carry out a KM activity within your organisation at some point in November. Which activity you choose is up to you – you could start small with something within your service (for example, a lessons learned review of a project), offer to facilitate something for another team or department, or go for something bigger like a knowledge cafe or a randomised coffee trial. There are lots of resources on the knowledge management toolkit pages to give you some ideas.

You can pledge in different ways:

  • There is an online option, using Padlet, which we’re encouraging you to use. On the site, you can see what other people have pledged, and make your own, without needing to login or create an account. It’s really easy – just click on the + in the pink circle at the bottom right hand corner of the page. Then add a title, your pledge, and your name and organisation. You can upload a photo as well.
  • Alternatively, you’ll be able to email your pledge for us to add to the list.
  • You’ll also be able to pledge in person at HLG (where we’re having a poster, so come and see us!) and at the events we’re running in September (see below).

Pledging just involves giving your name, organisation and what you’re planning on doing, or just your support for the campaign. This will help us to follow-up after Knowvember, and see what impact the campaign has had.

Support for getting involved

We’re holding 4 events in September which we hope will inspire you to get involved. The events will showcase KM activity that’s already going on in your region, and give you the opportunity to ask questions and find out more. They will also include the opportunity to take part in some KM activities, so that you can see how easy it is to run them, and how valuable they can be.

The events are free, and are open to all LKS staff. We’re holding one in each region:

North: Leeds, Thursday 13 September

Midlands and East: Leicester, Tuesday 18 September

South: Exeter, Wednesday 5 September

London and Kent, Surrey and Sussex: London, Wednesday 12 September

You can book into whichever event is easiest for you to get to, regardless of which region you’re in. The booking form is now open.

We’ll also be working with the lovely #ukmedlibs people to run a Twitter chat in October (16th), to encourage and inspire you to take part in the campaign.

Knowvember itself

We’re encouraging everyone involved to tweet about their activities during the month, using the hashtag #Knowvember18.

We’ll be organising a Thunderclap to help promote the campaign that we’ll be asking you to support.

Once you’ve carried out your KM event or activity, we’d be grateful if you could let us know, so that we can evaluate how successful the campaign has been. We’ll circulate a quick survey at the end of Knowvember to all those who pledged to join in.

Keep an eye out for our tweets and updates – and if you’d like any more information in the meantime, please contact knowvember@libraryservices.nhs.uk.

*We are a project group on the HEE/CILIP Leadership Development Programme 2017-18:

Clare Crowley, Natalie Gabe, Charlotte Greaves, Bennet Jones, Susannah Keill, Deborah Lepley, Hong-Anh Nguyen, Katie Nicholas, Preeti Puligari, David Watson, Fran Wilkie

3 ways – the creation of an institutional repository

The beginning

From the perspective of someone still in the early stages of setting up an institutional repository (IR) at Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust, I would recommend checking out the IR toolkit on the KfH website, which contains loads of hints, tips and case studies, and I also picked up some great ideas from the #ukmedlibs chat on IRs on 16th January (transcription available here). To try and establish the scope of the IR, I’ve been having ongoing conversations with colleagues in R&D, Practice Development, and Clinical Education regarding requirements and content, and there are a range of potential platforms to consider, limited at this stage to existing systems in the trust (e.g. SharePoint) and free software such as Zotero. Andrew Brown

The middle

Oxford Health Foundation Trust Libraries (OHFT)have just signed an agreement with KnowledgeArc to host a repository to launch soon. The 2017 Sally Hernando awards highlighted this company as providers of the ‘ORDA’ repository shared by 5 Derbyshire Trusts. We found their model most suitable for us; affordable but offering the full functionality of DSpace, open source repository software.

We met with staff from key departments in our Trust; R&D, Comms, Clinical Audit, Learning & Development, and IT.  All were supportive; recognising the benefits of providing access to Trust authored publications as well as sharing knowledge about OHFT initiatives. The Trust web developer played a key role in our group, providing technical advice and assessment of the various options considered.

RDE and Derbyshire Hospitals were very helpful in sharing their valuable experience and knowledge with us.

Getting to this point took rather a long time. Next steps are to decide on a suitable name (!) and set up our communities/collections. Sarah Maddock

 

The end

Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust (AWP) has set up a digital repository using SharePoint.

Why SharePoint?

  • Facilitates collaborative working
  • Simulates database functions “Lists”
  • Offers flexibility and can present information in different ways for different user requirements “Views”

Lists

  • SharePoint is organised within lists and these function in a similar way to spreadsheets.
  • Lists are a very effective way to manage, store and manipulate information. Details of staff research and publications are held in a spreadsheet imported into a list.

Views

  • The repository has several views that present different aspects of the data relating to the publications; ‘All Research’, ‘AWP Sponsored Research’ and ‘Systematic Reviews’ to a name a few.
  • The data that is presented within these ‘Views’ is filtered according to keywords in the columns within the ‘List’.

In the longer term, once the data has been cleansed, organised, and managed within SharePoint, it should be possible to present it for inclusion in a wider repository solution across the NHS Library, Knowledge, and Information community subject to the requirements of stakeholders here at AWP. Steven Walker

The STEM Club in the North East of England

Working in partnership to support the work of the Sustainability and Transformation Partnership

The publication of the NHS Five Year Forward View and the subsequent arrival of Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) signalled an attempt to change relationships between NHS providers and commissioners, moving away from a competitive marketplace towards closer partnership working.

In the North East of England, a group of staff from NHS Library and Knowledge Services, Commissioning and Public Health are looking to do the same. The Sustainability and Transformation Evidence Mobilisation Club (or STEM Club) is an informal group of colleagues working to support the mobilisation of evidence within the healthcare system.

We are trying to achieve this aim in two ways:

* By making links to work streams within the North East and Cumbria Partnership (and potentially beyond)

* By providing both virtual and real (in person) opportunities to connect as a group and understand who is working on what, making effective use of our collective knowledge and insights

A small group of STEM members has been meeting for over a year now and we have started to make links between work stream leads and library and knowledge staff. So far, a number of LKS staff have been involved in working on number of topics including:

* Frailty

* Maternal choice in perinatal care

* Physical exercise in preventive healthcare

We held our first full meeting of the STEM Club in March 2018. We used the name Club as the group has no formal governance arrangements as such. The event was attended by staff from LKS, Public Health, Commissioning and HE. A number of members of the group are from Yorkshire and Humber and we are happy to welcome colleagues from outside the North East. We were genuinely surprised at the level of enthusiasm in the room. There was a huge amount of interest in the work that has been done so far and a shared commitment to continuing with this approach. A few key challenges and affirmations came from the day:

* STEM is a “bottom-up” movement. This is genuine partnership working between colleagues with a shared interest in evidence mobilisation.

* We need to be responsive to the pace of work at a system level and be able to “share as we go”.

* We also need to be open to accessing and using a range of different types of evidence and knowledge (including tacit knowledge).

We are thinking about how we can share more widely regionally and nationally and we would be very interested to hear from others who have been working with their STPs locally.

The librarians who have been involved in the work are happy to share their experiences with you: Kirstin Himsworth County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust Claire Masterman County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust Dor Wilson Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust

You may also want to contact your Regional LKS Lead to find out more about working with STPs:

David Stewart  (North)

Ruth Carlyle (Midlands and the East)

Helen Bingham (South)

Louise Goswami (London & KSS)

Joanne Naughton
NHS Library and Knowledge Services Development Manager – North East