Knowledge Mobilisation Forum 2018 – Strutting our Stuff

Mobilising evidence and knowledge is a priority work stream for Knowledge for Healthcare.  Lots of work has taken place across the country to develop the confidence and skills of the LKS workforce to facilitate the use of knowledge mobilisation tools and techniques within their organisations.  Our aim is that this in turn, will lead to greater use of knowledge mobilisation tools by healthcare staff to share their knowledge and learning to improve productivity and the quality of care.

To celebrate this work and demonstrate the expertise and commitment to knowledge mobilisation within NHS Library and Knowledge Services, we encouraged colleagues across the regions to submit a range of abstracts to be presented as either lightening talks, workshops or market place stalls at the UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum Event in March 2018 http://knowledgemobilisation.net/.

The UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum was established in 2014 and as the website explains it is an annual event:

“for all those with a passion for ensuring that knowledge makes a positive difference to society. The Forum brings together practitioners, researchers, students, administrators and public representatives who are engaged in the art and science of sharing knowledge and ensuring that it can be used. The Forum is designed as a space for learning and reflection, providing an opportunity for sharing knowledge, experiences and methods and access to some of the most up to date thinking and practice in the field.”

Three of the six submissions that were put forward have been accepted:

  • Victoria Treadway/Tracey Pratchett: Exploring barriers to translating research into practice: a fishbowl conversation workshop
  • Susan Smith: Randomised Coffee Trials as a pre-conference conversation starter
  • Alison Day: Building confidence to mobilise knowledge in the health service marketplace to showcase cascade training materials and new e-learning modules

Delegates are attending with support from their regional lead. Networking with other attendees and seeking feedback about our initiatives will help to inform future developments for the Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge work stream.

Alison Day, Knowledge for Healthcare Project Manager, Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge Work Stream

STEP: your questions answered

The launch of first three STEP modules has generated a lot of positive feedback, some useful comments and a number of questions. Some key themes have emerged in the questions, so we hope this post will provide some useful guidance.

One of the most common questions we’ve received is whether the modules can be embedded into local Learning Management Systems. We are pleased to say that when all seven Modules are published on the e-Learning For Healthcare platform in the next few weeks, they will then be made available from the Electronic Staff Record eLearning portal.

For those of you who would like to add the modules to your local Learning Management Systems, you – or your local eLearning manager – can download them from the NHS eLearning Repository, when they become available we will let you know. Remember though, the modules don’t have to be accessed from within a Learning Management System, they can simply be played in a web browser. Alternatively, you can promote the modules on your library web site as Sarah has done, by adding this link and the link to our animations.

Based on some comments we’ve received, we wanted to share some other ideas about how you can use the STEP modules as part of your blended learning offer to complement your local training programmes.

Module 1 is a pre-assessment module which enables the learner to reflect on their current level of knowledge. It also acts a signpost to other modules, helping them to identify any gaps in knowledge or areas where they want to build confidence. This module includes a downloadable sheet for learners to record specific learning needs. You could ask trainees to complete Module 1 before a face to face training session and encourage them to bring their self-assessment sheet highlighting their learning needs.

Modules 2 and 3 cover which resources to search and how to plan a search strategy. These could also be completed prior to face to face training so that in your sessions you are free to focus on hands on practice. Alternatively for longer sessions, you could support users to complete the modules or parts of them within a session. You can also signpost to the modules post-training as a way to reinforce learning.

Module 3 has an animation on the use of OR/AND. As well as being embedded in the modules it is also available on You Tube for linking or embedding into websites or incorporating into presentation slides. You can either use the full video covering both OR/AND or shorter versions on just OR or AND to brighten up your training sessions.

We hope that you can find ways to use the suite of training to complement your existing training and to provide a tool which users can access for support from anywhere.

If you have any other ideas about how the modules could be used in your training, please add your comments below.

Thanks

Sarah and Tracey

Tracey Pratchett, Knowledge and Library Services Manager, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust tracey.pratchett@lthtr.nhs.uk

Sarah Lewis, Library Services Manager, Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust sarah.lewis@buckhealthcare.nhs.uk

Emerging Technology Group Update

Bah (hum) bugs.  Too many easy puns this time of the year.  Too easy…

Now where were we?  Since we last publicised our little group here at the KfH, our team members have been busy bees.  One such bee, Catherine, attended an interesting conference app-tly (like I said, too easy) named Internet Librarian International (ILI) conference.  Click here (www.swimsnetwork.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/newsletters/102-Swimming-Pool-Dec-2017.pdf)

and zoom to page 6 for fantastic insights.

For moi, Lesson #1 is worth a little discussion: fad vs trend.

Hands up to those who have bought that fancy piece of technology only to realise that after one mere annum down everyone’s life, you cannot even find it in ANY bargain basement of well-known low-cost high street shops?  I share your pain.  Truly.  Minidisc anyone?

For me, fad = fashion, trend = usefulness.  To wring it another way, perceived usefulness (fad) versus real usefulness (trend).  Things that showcase as the ‘must buy’, those high-fashion colourful shiny new tech, bits that make you feel superior and full of high status.  FAKE NEWS!!  Mundane, geeky, dull stuff, those you see people quoting lots of numbers and unheard of vernacular on.  REAL NEWS!!

Augmented reality/virtuality is a trend, virtual AI assistant (store.google.com/gb/product/google_home, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Alexa,  microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/cortana ) is a trend and common to popular beliefs, VR glasses is a trend (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Glass ).  Or certainly the beginning of one.  Curved TVs are a fad, >90% screen to body ratio phones are a fad; perhaps even smart watches are a fad.

What does this mean for LKS and the NHS?  Understanding the potential and utilising technological trends is very powerful indeed.  For example:

Virtual reality has already been utilised by cool surgeons for operating on patients (bartshealth.nhs.uk/news/surgeons-use-virtual-reality-to-operate-from-different-sides-of-the-world-2171 ).  AI and voice commands are already being explored within the health sectors by politicians and web giants (www.digitalhealth.net/2017/12/artificial-intelligence-voice-technology-health-sector).

So let’s take this one step further.

What if we can have a virtual library when someone dons  a VR headset/Google Glass?  How about if we use augmented virtuality for educational purposes or to simply tour our Trust (www2.mmu.ac.uk/creativear/projects/the-box-project-mixed-reality/)? How about if we complimented all this by AI virtual assistance to help with FAQs.  I could literally see Estates jumping for joy here at the sound of this, and the cries of ICT department at the implementation.

Hindsight is something of a wonderful thing however, and sadly, I do not have an X-Men like soothsayer’s abilities to predict such outcomes.  Only time will tell.  Ahh there goes my dream of owning an island filled with quokkas.

As the once famous (?) rapper said, back to reality.  Our team look to publish on our specialist technological domains once every two months, lovingly listed below.

David :                  Future concepts (AI; algorithms; augmented reality; automation; gamification)

Yi Wen:                Digital security (encryption; digital security; privacy issues and concerns; anonymity)

Catherine:           Software and apps (FOC and low cost readily available software or programs (for individual use or a small group); mobile apps )

Alex:                      Hardware (current and upcoming hardware (e.g. 3D printers, 3D/QR barcode, iPhone X); translation of industry hardware to LKS settings (e.g. manufacturing, engineering))

Stephen:              e-Platform and delivery methods (e-learning platform (to share knowledge) e.g. using Google Docs for lecture taking; digital social space/media;             digital methods of delivery (e.g. for knowledge mobilisation))

For those who are familiar with the TLDR (too long didn’t read):

Fad = fashion, trend = useful goodness.  Look out AI assistance, VR stuff and cheap VR headsets.  Ignore curved TVs.  I will leave you with one final thought:

are e-books a fad or a trend?

Happy Christmas 🙂

David Low
Emerging Technology Group