2018 Call for Innovations

Following some excellent entries to the Sally Hernando Innovation Awards last year, we are pleased to invite entries for the 2018 awards.  Once again, we want to hear about the new and innovative ideas Library and Knowledge services have been introducing over the past few years.

Feedback to several services last year was that their innovations were so new that there had been no time to undertake an evaluation – an essential element of the new process.  We would especially welcome re-submission of any of these projects where evaluation has now taken place.

The innovation form has been slightly revised this year to include a champion or witness statement from colleagues within your organisation who have worked with you on the innovations.  Please make sure that you use the latest version of the entry form on the blog.

Maria Grant has kindly agreed to select the winners of the award again this year.  We hope to announce the results of the 2018 awards to coincide with Libraries Week in October and there will be funding for the winners to present their innovations at HLG or a similar UK conference.

The new innovations form, guidance, and submission process can be found on the Knowledge for Healthcare Blog

The deadline for entries for the 2018 awards is Friday 9th March 2018

We look forward to hearing from you.

Dominic Gilroy
NHS LKS Development Manager Yorkshire and Humber
dominic.gilroy1@nhs.net

Joanne Naughton
NHS LKS Development Manager North East
joanne.naughton1@nhs.net

How an institutional repository can add value and enable organisational knowledge to be shared.

Every year the information analyst in our Research & Development (R&D) department would spend weeks combing through PubMed, searching for Trust authored publications, assembling incredibly long and complicated search strings, comparing results against spreadsheets of names of Trust researchers… then assembling a publications report to attach as an appendix to the annual R&D report to the Trust board, or a spreadsheet of figures to send off to funding bodies. Reports which would then disappear into filing cabinets, or creaky hard drives, never to see the light of day again…

Until R&D and the Library worked together to launched the institutional repository!

The repository serves a dual purpose:

Firstly, the publications data is collected, checked and added to the repository on a regular basis (by library staff), saving the R&D department literally “weeks of time” (direct quote from a very happy information analyst).

Secondly, the publication details are made freely available online – showcasing all the research that takes place in the Trust.

This data was already being collected, but placing it in the institutional repository added value to it by making it:

  • Visible, searchable, discoverable
  • Organised – by division, specialty or department
  • Shareable – easy to Tweet about new articles, embed RSS feeds of new articles into subject resource hubs/intranet
  • Connected – linking research articles to research projects on the Trust’s research information systems
  • Open Access – including full-text versions of articles within publisher’s permissions, or linking to articles on publisher’s sites.
  • Promotable – ability to create researcher profile pages listing publications (good for CVs!)
  • Patient engaging – research participants can see what has been published in the studies they have been a part of

Institutional repositories don’t have to be limited to just published journal articles, they can also include other organisational assets such as patient information leaflets, Trust reports and publications, conference posters, innovations…the possibilities are endless! Your IR can either be internal or external facing depending on the content (your innovations may be protected by intellectual property for example).

You don’t necessary need fancy technology to put together an institutional repository – it can be something as simple as a spreadsheet or a blog – any tool or mechanism you can use to capture and organise knowledge. If you’re thinking about starting an institutional repository, see the Knowledge for Healthcare Institutional Repository Toolkit for ideas, tips & hints and case studies.

Organising and mobilising knowledge is what we information professionals do best and institutional repositories are a great opportunity to develop and strengthen relationships with other departments in our organisations (we’re certainly working closer with R&D now!) and to demonstrate our skills and value, so go for it!

Cate Newell
Reader Services Librarian and RD&E Research Repository Manager
Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Foundation Trust

Knowledge Mobilisation Forum 2018 – Strutting our Stuff

Mobilising evidence and knowledge is a priority work stream for Knowledge for Healthcare.  Lots of work has taken place across the country to develop the confidence and skills of the LKS workforce to facilitate the use of knowledge mobilisation tools and techniques within their organisations.  Our aim is that this in turn, will lead to greater use of knowledge mobilisation tools by healthcare staff to share their knowledge and learning to improve productivity and the quality of care.

To celebrate this work and demonstrate the expertise and commitment to knowledge mobilisation within NHS Library and Knowledge Services, we encouraged colleagues across the regions to submit a range of abstracts to be presented as either lightening talks, workshops or market place stalls at the UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum Event in March 2018 http://knowledgemobilisation.net/.

The UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum was established in 2014 and as the website explains it is an annual event:

“for all those with a passion for ensuring that knowledge makes a positive difference to society. The Forum brings together practitioners, researchers, students, administrators and public representatives who are engaged in the art and science of sharing knowledge and ensuring that it can be used. The Forum is designed as a space for learning and reflection, providing an opportunity for sharing knowledge, experiences and methods and access to some of the most up to date thinking and practice in the field.”

Three of the six submissions that were put forward have been accepted:

  • Victoria Treadway/Tracey Pratchett: Exploring barriers to translating research into practice: a fishbowl conversation workshop
  • Susan Smith: Randomised Coffee Trials as a pre-conference conversation starter
  • Alison Day: Building confidence to mobilise knowledge in the health service marketplace to showcase cascade training materials and new e-learning modules

Delegates are attending with support from their regional lead. Networking with other attendees and seeking feedback about our initiatives will help to inform future developments for the Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge work stream.

Alison Day, Knowledge for Healthcare Project Manager, Mobilising Evidence and Knowledge Work Stream