Development Needs Analysis 2019

Help us plan our future CPD programme for you – the 2019 Library and Knowledge Services Development Needs Analysis Survey is now live and can be accessed by clicking here.  We need every member of the library and knowledge services team to complete it.

The survey runs until 30th November 2019.

Tell us what your development needs are and how you would prefer those needs to be met.

The 2017 Development Needs analysis was a great success with a record number of respondents (758). Crucially it created a rich data-set that allowed Health Education England to support your development at local, regional and national levels We ran a whole range of courses including measuring value and impact, and synthesising and summarising evidence.

Just to emphasise – we need everyone to complete the 2019 survey so that we can plan programmes over the next two years. We look forward to seeing what you say.

Many thanks

David Stewart

Lead for Workforce Planning and Development

Impact Reminder and Update

A number of colleagues have asked for a reminder about the processes for submitting impact case studies, and around vignettes and social cards.  Therefore, this blog serves as both a reminder and an introduction for colleagues new to the process.

Impact Toolkit

The Knowledge for Healthcare Blog includes a Value and Impact Toolkit which includes links to the national Generic Impact Survey.  We recommend that services use these core questions in their own local surveys and from time to time we will ask colleagues to share your data with HEE LKS Leads so that we can collate it nationally.

You will also find an interview template on the blog which may be useful in gathering qualitative impact data from library and knowledge service users.  An Impact Case Study template provides a resource for collating the key details from the interview. 

Services are then encouraged to submit completed case studies through the blog.  These are reviewed by teams of LKS colleagues from across the country and, where they meet the key criteria, added to the blog.

While you are not obliged to use the Impact Case Study template, you may find it easier to do so.  It has been designed in such a way as to encourage you to meet the criteria used for review later. Therefore if you use an alternative format we would encourage you to look at the criteria to make sure you are capturing the key elements in your narrative.

What happens after submission?

Once you have submitted your case study these are periodically sent to LKS colleagues for review against the criteria.  If they meet the three core criteria of clarity around what has been achieved, the impact involved, and the role of the library, then they are added to the Case Studies listing on the blog.

We encourage services to include quotes from named library champions in case studies.  If this is present, and if there is detail of cost or time savings, or similar high-level impact, then these case studies are developed into impact vignettes.  The impact vignettes are shared on the blog and also fed back to the service which submitted the corresponding case study and the local HEE LKS Leads.

What if I want to create my own vignette?

Templates for the development of vignettes and social cards have been made available on the blog.  These are intended for local use by your service in developing promotional tools.  You do not need to send any locally created vignettes to us via the blog because, where appropriate, we will develop these from your reviewed case studies.

What is the difference between a vignette and a social card?

The vignettes feature headlines, summaries and quotes about impact case studies whereas the social cards feature senior leaders endorsing #AMillionDecisions, providing a photograph and quote about the role of librarians and knowledge specialists in enabling the use of evidence and knowledge to inform decisions. ​

Applying the International Handbook of Health Literacy to health library and knowledge services

Personal reflections by Ruth Carlyle

The International Handbook of Health Literacy was published at the beginning of August 2019. Thanks to funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the 740 page volume is available open access

The editors bring together a truly international set of papers in the 45 chapters. The volume is in four parts: research into health literacy, an overview of recent developments; programmes and interventions to promote health literacy; policy programmes to promote health literacy; and future dialogue and new perspectives.

As a collected work, the International Handbook of Health Literacy affirms the relevance of health literacy across a wide range of disciplines and ‘the potential that has been attributed to health literacy in order to understand, explain and tackle individual as well as group differences in various health outcomes’ (p. xxi). Despite this potential, there is no unanimously accepted definition or measurement of health literacy (p. xxii, 139). Most of the definitions also focus on the ‘literacy’ aspects of ‘health literacy’ rather than the ‘health’ aspects (p. 649).

In the closing chapter, Stephan Van der Bourke suggests that there are three types of strategy that can be applied to address low health literacy: better health communication; better health education for the general population; and creating health literacy-friendly settings (p. 706).

Considered from the perspective of library and information services, the specific references to libraries and librarians appear in the third section of the volume, on policy programmes to promote health literacy. It is notable that the most extensive references appear in Chapter 28 on the development and implementation of Making it easy and Making it easier as health literacy policies for Scotland. NHS Education for Scotland works with library and knowledge services across a range of sectors to improve ‘signposting to useful health information’ (p. 425) and identifies closer working with librarians as one of the areas for further development (p. 431). Librarians elsewhere are involved in supporting health literacy through training the healthcare workforce (National Network of Libraries of Medicine, United States, p. 499), embedding health literacy into research and practice (British Columbia, p. 447) and creating portals of resources (New Zealand, p. 508).

The multidisciplinary and international nature of the handbook provide a resource that emphasises the scale of low health literacy as an issue and the need for a shared approach working across disciplines. The individual chapters provide insights into research studies and the needs of specific audiences, such as children and older people. Themes through the volume provide evidence of the importance of improving the awareness and communication of healthcare professionals, signposting to high-quality health information for the public and creating health literacy-friendly environments. These reinforce the value of the roles that health library and knowledge services can play in health literacy.