Lesson Learnt: Supporting your organisation to capture the learning during Covid-19

Now that we are moving in to the next stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, your organisation may be beginning to reflect on the last three months. This period will be an important time for organisations to learn and develop based on experience and plan changes built on that new knowledge. Library and Knowledge specialists are in a unique position where we can share our expertise in capturing this knowledge for future planning and service development. Have you considered offering to support your organisation in capturing lessons learnt?

The Covid-19 pandemic has seen services undertake an intense and abrupt period of change, some of these changes will now be permanent. Some alterations will be reverted, but it is likely that at least some changes will remain in place for the foreseeable future.

This guide was recently shared on the KM email list and has been written by the RSA (Royal Society of Arts, Manufacturers and Commerce). The purpose of the guide is to help organisations make sense of the changes made in response to crisis management. Included is a grid which can help you to reflect on the changes that have occurred. What will remain in place, what needs to be reverted and which old practices have proved to be unnecessary. This is a simple and easy way to capture learning from a team and help them to see how they can plan for the future.

Some Library and Knowledge Services are already running these sessions. The team at Lancashire Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust have been using this framework from Collaborate for Social Care. There are either eight questions to work through to identify how the team are thinking and working in new ways, or there is a deeper thematic questionnaire to work through. This post from Collaborate for Care’s blog on the learning framework and how to use Covid-19 learning to shape the future offers further insight to the value of organisational learning.

The Library and Knowledge Services that are supporting the Nightingale Hospitals have also recently undertaken an After Action Review. This will allow those involved to use their shared learning when undertaken similar projects in the future and alter their practice should they need to in the event of a second wave.

Health Education England’s Knowledge Management Team have produced a suite of resources to support the organisation to capture their own lessons learnt. Katie Nicholas has created this excellent guide which you can use to explain and promote these services within your own organisation. If you are concerned about how to get different departments interested in your support consider running your own lessons learnt session or retrospective review with your team. Showcase how the reflections you’ve made and learning captured will change your service in a positive way. Organisations like to see outcomes in terms of time and financial savings, so consider that while you are writing up your findings.

Holly Case Wyatt
Library and Knowledge Services Development Manager
Directorate of Innovation and Transformation
M: 07741238740
E: holly.casewyatt@hee.nhs.uk

Black Lives Matter in Health Libraries

“To show up imperfectly but open to change is better than not showing up at all”
@shopsundae, Instagram

On Friday 17th July, 76 healthcare knowledge and Library staff joined us for the Black Lives Matter in Health Libraries virtual discussion. It was led by Hong-Anh Nguyen and Natasha Howard who have previously delivered sessions on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion to the healthcare library workforce and have acted as beacons in this work.

Natasha, Hong-Anh and I started to discuss ED&I learning opportunities last year. We wanted to push forward open conversations and galvanise us as a workforce to take more action. It might not come as a surprise that our initial idea was to have face to face workshops across each region, but due to the pandemic we had to explore the idea of doing something virtual. Then the world watched in horror as George Floyd was murdered by the people who were supposed to protect him and the Black Lives Matter movement exploded. I, like many white people or people with privilege, was suddenly uncomfortably aware that I wasn’t doing enough. That I wasn’t being anti-racist and that I needed to take action. Fully confronting your privilege and complicity is a deeply uncomfortable but necessary process, and once you have come to accept it, it is time to get to work. Seeing how many people booked on to this session made me realise that many of us feel the same way and that taking action in our professional lives can help make the changes we so desperately want to embody.

We asked the network which topics you wanted to discuss and we had some great questions. When we looked through them ahead of the event there were some clear themes emerging. These are the main questions that we worked through, although further questions and experiences were shared by participants throughout;

  • How can library staff, regardless of level or role, effect positive change and influence upwards where resistance is being met?
  • What does it mean to decolonise a library in the healthcare context?
  • How can libraries promote their EDI collections and encourage engagement with this topic through the resources they provide?
  • What should library collections relating to EDI or BAME groups be called? What language would be most appropriate and least offensive?

From our discussions it was clear that many of us are worried about doing or saying the wrong thing, but the clearest message I took away was to educate myself when feeling unsure. That’s why we have created a reading list of resources for you. This covers a wide range of media (articles, books, podcasts), educational tools to work through, broad themes on the topic to more specific information on diversity in libraries. We have made the recording of the event available for you to view and will soon publish a transcript of the discussion. Hopefully these resources will be the starting point for us in taking action in dismantling inequality in health libraries and our workforce.

One of the key things I’ve learnt so far is that it is not the responsibility of our Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic friends and colleagues to educate us about discrimination they may face to work, nor how our services contribute to that discrimination. Those of us with privilege can undertake that learning ourselves. I have made the commitment to being an ally through a process of lifelong learning. With that comes the understanding that I might not always get it right, but as long as we are trying then change can begin to occur. I hope you will join me.

Holly Case-Wyatt
LKS Development Manager, HEE London, Kent, Surrey and Sussex
lks-lkss@hee.nhs.uk 

Health Information Week 2020 (#HIW2020) – have your say!

Health Information Week 2020 (#HIW2020) finished just a month ago. It was an unusual year this year, with covid-19 having a substantial impact on what was possible during #HIW2020. Now is a good time to take stock and reflect on your local events – what went well? What would you do differently next time? How can the national team better support you? What value is there in doing #HIW2020? What impact has it had on your users and your community?

Every year, the national HIW team also evaluate the week to see what could be done better next year. Your feedback is a really important part of this. For example, the new branding and website for #HIW2020 are in response to your feedback in previous years. It would be great to know what you think of the website and the branding.

Based on what you’ve done locally, we also add any new ideas or advice on what’s worked well to the Ideas Bank for next year. This means that other people can benefit from sharing your ideas. We’d love to hear from you! You can either email your local evaluation to us as it stands, or complete the survey, or both.

The survey is at https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/37UM42/ The survey will be open until 18th September.

You can also email local evaluations to healthinfoweek@gmail.com

We’re looking forward to hearing from you!