Category Archives: Quality and Impact

National Statistics Return Infographics

Every year HEE’s Library Leads gather information from NHS funded Library and Knowledge Services in the regular statistics returns.  This information is vital to many of our decisions, strategies, and actions but the data itself is often hidden from sight.

This year we have developed a series of Infographics to share back with you some of the findings of the latest staffing and activity returns.  We hope that you find these interesting and useful.

Please click on the links to download Infographics in PDF format

Impact Reminder and Update

A number of colleagues have asked for a reminder about the processes for submitting impact case studies, and around vignettes and social cards.  Therefore, this blog serves as both a reminder and an introduction for colleagues new to the process.

Impact Toolkit

The Knowledge for Healthcare Blog includes a Value and Impact Toolkit which includes links to the national Generic Impact Survey.  We recommend that services use these core questions in their own local surveys and from time to time we will ask colleagues to share your data with HEE LKS Leads so that we can collate it nationally.

You will also find an interview template on the blog which may be useful in gathering qualitative impact data from library and knowledge service users.  An Impact Case Study template provides a resource for collating the key details from the interview. 

Services are then encouraged to submit completed case studies through the blog.  These are reviewed by teams of LKS colleagues from across the country and, where they meet the key criteria, added to the blog.

While you are not obliged to use the Impact Case Study template, you may find it easier to do so.  It has been designed in such a way as to encourage you to meet the criteria used for review later. Therefore if you use an alternative format we would encourage you to look at the criteria to make sure you are capturing the key elements in your narrative.

What happens after submission?

Once you have submitted your case study these are periodically sent to LKS colleagues for review against the criteria.  If they meet the three core criteria of clarity around what has been achieved, the impact involved, and the role of the library, then they are added to the Case Studies listing on the blog.

We encourage services to include quotes from named library champions in case studies.  If this is present, and if there is detail of cost or time savings, or similar high-level impact, then these case studies are developed into impact vignettes.  The impact vignettes are shared on the blog and also fed back to the service which submitted the corresponding case study and the local HEE LKS Leads.

What if I want to create my own vignette?

Templates for the development of vignettes and social cards have been made available on the blog.  These are intended for local use by your service in developing promotional tools.  You do not need to send any locally created vignettes to us via the blog because, where appropriate, we will develop these from your reviewed case studies.

What is the difference between a vignette and a social card?

The vignettes feature headlines, summaries and quotes about impact case studies whereas the social cards feature senior leaders endorsing #AMillionDecisions, providing a photograph and quote about the role of librarians and knowledge specialists in enabling the use of evidence and knowledge to inform decisions. ​

Evaluating Health Information Week 2019 (#HIW2019)

Health Information Week takes place between 1st-7th July 2019. So, what impact do you want your contribution to make?

We all know it’s important to evaluate impact, to show what benefit there is from putting time and resources into an event like #HIW2019. However, #HIW2019 hasn’t happened yet – so why are we thinking about evaluating it now? It’s really important to think about what you want your contribution to #HIW2019 to achieve now, so you can plan how you will collect the data to assess whether you have successfully achieved the impact you were planning for. Perhaps you want to encourage a behaviour change by highlighting ways to have a healthy lifestyle or encourage people to take up a particular call to action?  Identifying the impact you want your information to have early on, and how you will measure it, will make it much easier to demonstrate the value of investing the time and resources involved.

Some of the data you might want to collect:

  • Numbers: How many people attended your event(s)? How many took up free health checks (weight, blood pressure, etc.)? How many took leaflets, asked questions, or made health pledges? How many people interacted with your social media posts? Did service use change? Did any local newspapers or other media report on your event?
  • Qualitative data: What impact do patients and members of the public say #HIW2019 had for them? What did they learn? What questions did they ask? What impact do colleagues and contacts from your own and other organisations describe from #HIW2019 ? Are they willing to provide quotes?
  • Photos: Photos of your event or display can give the feel of your event in a way that words can’t (although do bear in mind the need for appropriate consent when taking photos)
  • Other information: What worked well? Which contacts have you made within your own or other organisations? What has happened as a result? What would you do differently next time?
  • The #HIW2018 evaluation also gives some examples of the types of information and data you could collect.

There’s a number of ways you can collect data and share your #HIW2019 evaluations:

However you choose to evaluate #HIW2019 , please share it with the national team at healthinfoweek@gmail.com or via the survey. We will collate all the information, so learning can be shared nationally and everybody working with information for patients and the public can benefit from your work!

Updated 4 June 2019